Death Valley National Park UniGrid Brochure

Audio Available:

OVERVIEW. About this audio-described brochure

Welcome to the audio description of Death Valley National Park's official brochure. It provides visitor information and an overview of the park landscape. 

This audio version lasts 1 hour and 55 minutes, divided into 19 sections. Sections 1 and 2 provide a 1 minute overview. Sections 3 to 7 describe the front of the brochure focusing on the park landscape in 13 minutes. Sections 8 to 14 describe visitor information on the back of the brochure in 3 minutes. Sections 9 to 31, describe the park maps in 1 hour, 38 minutes.

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OVERVIEW. Death Valley National Park

Hottest, Dryest, and Lowest National Park.

In this below sea level basin, steady drought and record summer heat make Death Valley a land of extremes, yet each extreme has a striking contrast. Towering peaks are frosted with winter snow. Rare rainstorms bring vast fields of wildflowers. Lush oases harbor tiny fish and refuge for wildlife and humans. Despite its morbid name, a great diversity of life survives in Death Valley.

This brochure will introduce you to the significant features of Death Valley and provide information to help you plan your visit.

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OVERVIEW. Front side of brochure

The horizontal page has a black title band on the left edge. Text inside the title band reads. Death Valley National Park, California, Nevada, National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior. Also in the black band is a logo, a brown textured arrowhead, pointing down. Inside the arrowhead, at the upper right, white words, National Park Service. A white bison stands in the foreground at the bottom. Behind it, a green field leads to a tree line, a white lake on the right and a towering sequoia tree to the left. A snow-capped mountain looms in the background.

The rest of the page is filled with a color composite illustration of the major features of Death Valley. The illustration is divided down the middle into day time with blue sky on the left and night time with a starry sky on the right. Each of these two sections has a title and short paragraph at the top.

The illustration shows a broad valley with hills rising on the left and right sides of the page. In the foreground, the viewer's ground-level perspective gives a detailed view of tiny plants, animals, and rocks. Unique in this foreground is a random pattern of lines covering the flattest part of the dry valley bed. The lines connect to each other creating angular shapes.

Moving up the page toward the mid-ground is a flat open valley defined by hills rising on the left and right. Here, the viewer can find people, structures, rock features, and other larger plants and animals. Moving further up the page into the distant view is the horizon of this flat valley and distant mountains. A storm cloud drops rain and lightning. In the sky are birds on the left, and bats on the right.

Further details of this illustration are provided in the next 4 segments.

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TEXT. Death Valley Day time

Death Valley...

So empty, so vast, so simple, so quiet. Then, with a rush and a cry, a raven soars past, drawing your attention to the unexpected details around you. A flicker of movement makes you grab your camera, but the lizard darts away before you can take a picture. Now you notice flowers growing in the shadow of a rock. More surprises await.

Discover pine woodlands atop high mountains or life crowded around isolated springs. Rise with the sun and watch light touch the snowy peaks, slide down the slopes, and illuminate the valley floor, revealing colors and textures that wash out in the harsh light of mid day.

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ILLUSTRATION. Death Valley Day time

The left side of the illustration provides a close-up, day time view of the following ten plants and animals amidst the rounded rocks covering the foreground.


1 of 10. Harvester Ant

This tiny black creature's body is built of contrasting shapes. A bulbous head and abdomen contrasted with eight angular bent stick-like legs. 


2 of 10. Lilac Sun Bonnet

No bigger than the ant, and with no visible stem, these short  five pointed white petals have tiny purple spots at each end and a droplet of large purple color in the center. They sit among small pointed green leaves nestled among the rocky ground.


3 of 10. Brown eyed Evening Primrose

This low-growing, pink-stemmed flower has multiple clusters of small pink short-petaled blossoms. Green leaves are spear-shaped with darker veins extending outward from the center vein.


4 of 10. White lined sphinx moth caterpillar

Crawling on a leaf of a Brown-eyed Evening Primrose, this long, tube-shaped, yellow-green caterpillar has a black face at one end and an orange pointed tip extending up from its tail end. Thin black stripes and red-orange dots run along its back.


5 of 10. Zebra tailed Lizard

This light tan reptile perches up on its long legs, its long toes stretched out on the rocky surface. Its tail of horizontal black stripes curls up in the air, and its triangular head is up and alert. On its side, just behind the front leg, is a colorful marking of gold, blue, and black.


6 of 10. Desert Five-spot

This low-growing, pink-stemmed flower has clumps of new buds and one round, pink, short-petaled blossom. Its dark green leaves are rounded with serrated edges, and dark veins extend outward from the stem.


7 of 10. Mojave Desert Star

The small yellow-centered flower with about a dozen long, oval, white petals extends outward sit low to the ground over a small clump of long, oval, green leaves.


8 of 10.  Chuckwalla

The belly of this long lizard rests on the rocky ground, its head slightly raised, showing wrinkled skin around its neck and shoulders. The light brown body is long, lean, and smooth with a long, scaley tail disappearing behind some vegetation. The folded legs are short and tucked slightly under its body while its bent arms seem to claw its way off the illustration.


9 of 10. Desert Gold

Clusters of small yellow flowers sit on long, thin stems above lush clumps of long, oval-shaped, green leaves. The flowers have many long, oval petals drooping outward and down from an orange center.


10 of 10. Roadrunner

This long-legged, brown mottled bird is on the sun baked valley floor, aimed toward the rocky foreground. Its dark brown head feathers spike up, its white beak extends straight out opposite long brown tail feathers that are held horizontal to the ground.


Moving up the page into the mid-ground are less detailed, larger species or scenes, including the following 8 features:


1 of 8.  Pickleweed

Spreading clumps of green grassy plants with woody stems line the edge of the dry valley floor and extend up the rocky hillside.


2 of 8. Pupfish

Swimming in a small pool surrounded by pickleweed, these tiny fish live in a small, wet world surrounded by the dry landscape.


3 of 8. Timbisha Shoshone

Two people appear next to a tall Honey mesquite plant. One, with long black hair wearing a light purple skirt, darker purple short-sleeved shirt, and gray flat shoes, holds a brown sac in her left hand while reaching high above her head to pick mesquite bean pods. The second person with long black hair sits cross-legged in the shade of the mesquite, wearing a red tee-shirt and blue shorts looking out toward the valley.


4 of 8. Honey mesquite

This large, rounded, bush-like plant with woody stems holds dozens of slender, light-colored bean pods and creates deep shade under its bowering green branches.


5 of 8. Desert Holly

Scattered widely along the base of the mountain, these low-lying, silver-green shrubs extend into the distance. Above the scattered holly, the land sloping up into the hills is covered in yellow flowers.


6 of 8. Bighorn Sheep

Up the rocky slopes from the mesquite and holly is a cluster of five light-brown bighorn sheep, aptly named for their large curving horns extending above each side of their head. Two are facing away from the viewer, showing their white rump and short dark tails as their heads bend to the ground.


7 of 8. Scotty’s Castle

Above the sheep, high on the brown, rocky slope, is a white castle with a round turret next two red-roofed rectangular buildings. Additional rectangular structures extend to the right of the turret. Above the turret flies an indistinct flag. Green vegetation frames some of the walls.


8 of 8. Mine Ruin

Downslope from the Scotty's Castle in the mid-distance is a wooden, rectangular building perched on a stilt-like foundation secured to the sloping rock wall. Just below, on the dry flat valley floor, are two people walking along the flat valley floor. One wears a backpack.

As the mountains fade into the distance, the details of plants and animals disappear, leaving only the brown and beige colors of the exposed rocky slopes and ledges. The sky above is flat blue with a few wispy clouds on the left. Two birds fly above the foreground scene showing the last of the species in this scene:


Ravens.

Two entirely black birds fly above the scene, their wings bent, the short stout bill of one is open as if calling to the other with its legs angling up underneath his body.


In the background, and large white rounded cloud sits above the flat valley floor, an angled line shows a rainstorm extending from the base of the cloud to the ground.




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TEXT. Death Valley Night time

Half the park is after dark when silence and darkness reign. 

At night, your senses sharpen to detect subtle sounds and the glory of the night sky. Be still and listen. The silence is so deep you can hear crystals on the salt flats pop as they contract in the cooling evening. Catch a glimpse of creatures once hidden from the day time heat, now skittering between rocks or racing across the sand. As your eyes adjust to the dark, look up. The clear, dry air and few lights let billions of stars shine through Earth’s atmosphere. This after-dark extravaganza has earned Death Valley the designation of International Dark Sky Park.

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ILLUSTRATION. Death Valley Night time

The right side of the illustration provides a close-up night time view of the following 8 plants and animals amidst the rounded rocks covering the foreground.

1 of 8. Desert Hairy Scorpion 

This eight-legged arachnid sits like a long rounded rock with four sharp angular legs on either side. The front two have enlarged pincers, both open. The long sectioned tail wraps up and over the back with the sharp stinger tucked underneath itself.


 2 of 8. Notch-leaf phacelia

This wavy green-leafed plant has tall stalks topped with tiny, five-petalled, purple flowers, blooming at night.


3 of 8. Desert kangaroo rat

The little brown rat with its big head, big eyes, and tiny ears sits up on long, slender, white hind legs. Its long, white tail extends out nearly twice the length of its body, curling slightly along the rocks.


4 of 8. Brown I'd evening primrose

A cluster of wide, oval, serrated leaves supports a few tall stems topped with a large blossom made of several small, four-petalled, pink flowers, blooming at night.


5 of 8. White-lined sphinx moth

The outstretched wings of this brown-and-white striped moth are as long as its body. A proboscis, or long tongue, extends past the two antennae and into the blossom of the primrose flower.


6 of 8. Kit fox

The tan and brown fur of this small, dog-like fox appears whiter in the moonlight. Its big ears are pricked, its left forepaw is raised, and its two brown eyes have a sharp gaze as it moves across the rocky desert floor.


7 of 8. Pallid bat

Hovering just over the scorpion, the wide, dark wings of the pallid bat reveal long thin arms, fingers, and legs. The mouse-like brown body is only slightly larger than its angular head and large, pointy ears. Black-button eyes and nose and four fangs, two on its upper jaw and two on its lower jaw, define its tiny face. Two other bats fly much higher against the backdrop of the starry sky.


8 of 8. Sidewinder

This curving snake emerged from a hole in the ground, its head facing the mountains in the distance. It has a light-colored body with brown checkered markings.


In the mid-ground two larger features are shown:

1 of 2. Coyote 

Standing firm on four legs, the bushy-tailed, dog-like, coyote howls with its neck stretched and its head pointed straight up at the night sky.


2 of 2. Creosote bush

These large, rounded clumps of dark green shrubs dot the lower hills, sitting mostly in the low places.


In the background, the details of rocks, plants and animals disappear, leaving smooth mountains that appear purple. Off on a distant hill are rounded lumps with small entrances; these are charcoal kilns.


Beyond the valley the dark clod of a thunderstorm brighten with a burst of white lightning.

In the sky, sparkling above the scene, are countless white stars of different sizes set against a black backdrop. An elongated cluster of stars runs vertically from the horizon up to the top of the painting.

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OVERVIEW. Back side of brochure

The vertical page, capped at the top with the black title band, is filled with a light brown background, the map of Death Valley National Park and surrounding area. 


The map shows north at the top. The park shape is an elongated area running from the upper left corner to the lower right corner.


In the upper right corner sit three inset boxes with additional maps and text. 


In the lower left corner is visitor information text and the map legend.

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TEXT. Welcome to Death Valley

The park newspaper, available at visitor centers and online, has articles about the park, information about services, and suggestions of what to see and do.

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TEXT. Accessibility

We strive to make our facilities, services, and programs accessible to all. For information go to the visitor center, ask a ranger, call, or check the park web site.

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TEXT. Safety

Emergencies call, nine one one, or contact a park ranger


Do not rely on cell phones and GPS. Service may be non-existent or unreliable.

 •Obey the speed limit.

 •Keep hydrated; drink water. 

• Avoid activity in the heat.

 •Do not approach or touch wildlife.

 •Avoid canyons during rain storms.

 •Keep out of mines.

 •Ask about unpaved road conditions before you travel in the backcountry.


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TEXT. Prohibited activities

• Off-road driving or bicycling.

•Campfires outside developed campgrounds.

•Wood gathering.

•Collecting, removing, or disturbing rocks, plants, animals, or historic artifacts.

•Littering.

•Discharging firearms and target shooting.

•Feeding wildlife.

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TEXT. Pets

• Keep pets on a leash.

•Never leave pets alone, especially in a vehicle. Temperatures inside can climb to 160°F.  A pet can die quickly.

•Pets are prohibited off roads and on trails


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TEXT. More Information

Death Valley is one of over 400 parks in the National Park System. To learn more about parks, visit w w w dot n p s dot g o v

ADDRESS. PO Box five seventy nine, Death Valley, California. 9 2 3 2 8

PHONE. 760-786-3200

WEB SITE. w w w dot n p s dot g o v  slash d e v a 

Latitude longitude

N 36 degrees 27.70 W 116 degrees 52.00.

National Park Foundation. Join the park community, w w w dot nationalparks dot o r g

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MAP. Death Valley National Park short description

Death Valley National Park map


This visitor information map shows features important to most visitors. It includes way-finding information like roads and trails and geographic features like mountain peaks, mountain ranges, valleys, and canyons. Symbols and labels identify facilities, services, safety and accessibility information, and other special features.


The park is a 2-hour drive west from Las Vegas Nevada, in southeastern California with a small triangular section in Nevada. The map is oriented so that north is up at the top of the page.


Death Valley runs northeast to southwest between the Amargosa Range on the east and the Panamint Range on the west, roughly parallelling the California-Nevada border.


Death Valley is about 140 miles long, from the head of Last Chance Canyon in the northwest to where the Amargosa River makes its big bend near Saratoga Springs in the southeast.


The park has an irregular border. It angles sharply out to the west at Sarcobatus Flat in Nevada. The rest of the park is in California and stretches east to the Inyo Mountains, north to the Sylvania Mountains, and south to the Quail Mountains.


The main visitor center and museum area at Scotty's Castle is temporarily closed due to flood damage.


The Furnace Creek Visitor Center is located off Route one ninety near its intersection with Route one seventy-eight, just north of the Timbisha Shoshone Village which is private.


The park has over 300 miles of paved roads, 300 miles of improved dirt roads, and several hundred miles of unmaintained 4-by-4 roads in the park plus hiking trails. Some road conditions require heavy-duty tires, high-clearance vehicles, experienced four-wheel drivers, or vehicles with a short wheelbase. In winter some roads may close or require you to carry chains. Some roads prohibit vehicles longer than 25 feet, 7.7 meters, and may be rough, narrow, and winding. Be alert for sharp rock, two-way roads, flooding, and deep sand in some areas of the park.


WARNING! Do not use this map for hiking or backcountry road travel. Detailed maps are available at the visitor center and ranger stations.


A tactile map of the vista from Dantes View is available at the Dantes View site.

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MAP. Death Valley National Park long description

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MAP. Overview and Park Boundary

Overview

A 2-inch-wide black band with the text, Death Valley National Park, spans the entire top of the page.

The Death Valley National Park map covers the entire back side with three inset maps in the upper right corner. The three inset maps are labeled, Furnace Creek Area, To Preserve a Way of Life, and, To Preserve Wilderness. All maps orient with north at the top.

The park map uses shades of white and light brown for higher elevations and golden-brown with green and purple for lower elevations. Bodies of water are shown in light blue. Mountain ranges, peaks, and valleys are labeled with dark red text. Named features like towns, park sites, roads, and points of interest are labeled in black text.


Park Boundary

A light green boundary line shows the park's irregular shape. The park is longer, northwest to southeast, than it is wide, southwest to northeast. Part of the park boundary, between 12 and 1 on a clock face, juts out in like a right triangle northeast of Stovepipe Wells and the Amargosa Range. The park boundary runs from Cucomungo Canyon in the northwest, about 11 on a clock face, to a point in the southeast about a ten-mile drive from Saratoga Springs, about 4 on a clock face. From north to south, the Inoyo Mountains, Panamint Valley, Slate Range, and Quail Mountains are to the west right outside the park boundary. From north to south, the Sylvania Mountains, Slate Ridge, Sarcobatus Flat, Amargosa Desert, and the towns of Death Valley Junction then Shoshone are to the east, right outside the park boundary.


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MAP. Central Geographic Features

Broadly speaking, the park's shape seems to dive like a bird into water, from northwest to southeast, alongside the Nevada California border. The primary geographic features within the park boundary are Death Valley, the Panamint Range, and the Amargosa Range. Death Valley is the park's centerpiece in the geographic center of the park. The Panamint Range runs along the western side of Death Valley while the Amargosa Range runs along the northeast side of Death Valley. These three features cluster centrally within the park boundary and squeeze into one of the most narrow areas of the park, filling that area almost completely, yet these main geographic features do not extend to the northern and southern ends of the park.


Stovepipe Wells Village sits a the approximate center of the park, and near the center of the brochure page. The following four audio description segments describe the four quadrants around Stovepipe Wells at the center.

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MAP. Geographic Features. Northeast Quadrant

With Stovepipe Wells Village at the approximate center of the park and the brochure, over two thirds of the northeast quadrant shows areas outside the park boundary.


The park boundary follows along part of the Nevada California border then juts out at a right angle at one o'clock before continuing along the border past three o'clock.

Clockwise from twelve o'clock to three o'clock, the main geographic feature within the park boundary is the Amargosa Range, which includes Grapevine Mountains and Funeral Mountains in this quadrant and Black Mountains farther south. These features run alongside each other as the Amargosa Range stretches northwest to southeast through the park. North to south, Grapevine Mountains features Grapevine Peak at a height of 8,738 feet, or 2,663 meters, Phinney Canyon, Wahguyhe Peak at 8,629 feet, or 2,630 meters, Mount Palmer at 7,979 feet, or 2,432 meters, Red Wall Canyon, Fall Canyon, Titus Canyon, Red Pass, Thimble Peak at 6,381 feet, or 1,945 meters, Titanothere Canyon, Corkscrew Peak at 5,804 feet, or 1,769 meters, Daylight Pass at 4,316 feet, or 1,316 meters, Death Valley Buttes, Kit Fox Hills, and Mud Canyon. Southwest of Kit Fox Hills are the southeastern section of Mesquite Flat and the Mesquite Flat Sand Dunes. Continuing southeast into the Funeral Mountains of the Amargosa Range are the peaks at Chloride Cliff and Indian Pass. The Amargosa Range and Funeral Mountains continue southeast from here.

Outside the park boundary, going clockwise, geographic features include the northern tip of the Amargosa Range, the large Sarcobatus Flat area to the east bounded by Stonewall Mountain to the north and Bullfrog Hills to the south. Bull Frog Hills are half-inside and half-outside the park boundary. The small Oasis Valley is northeast of Bullfrog Hills, across Nevada Route 95. Bare Mountain is south of Oasis Valley. 


Finally, Amargosa Desert stretches Bullfrog Hills south between Bare Mountain and the Funeral Mountains along the Nevada state border continuing just beyond the 3 o'clock position. It includes the Amargosa River and Big Dune.


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MAP. Geographic Features. Southeast Quadrant

With Stovepipe Wells Village at the approximate center of the park and the brochure, the southeast quadrant of the map is packed with natural features. 

Clockwise from 3 o'clock to 6 o'clock, the major geographic features within the Death Valley National Park boundary include the southern half of the Amargosa Range, which includes the southern section of the Funeral Mountains at 3 o'clock and all of the Black Mountains at 4 o'clock. The semi circle shaped Owlshead Mountains are southeast, at five o'clock, while the southern end of the Panamint Range wrinkles up into high peaks along most of the map's 6 o'clock area. Between these two ranges is the southern end of Death Valley. Central to this quadrant is Badwater Basin, salt flats shown in bright white, which is the lowest elevation in North America at 282 feet, 86 meters, below sea level.


Features of the southern Funeral Mountains within the park boundary include, north to south, Winters Peak at 5,033 feet, 1,534 meters, Nevares Peak at 2,859 feet, 871 meters, Echo Canyon, Schwaub Peak at 6,448 feet, 1,965 meters, Furnace Creek Wash, and located just southeast of here Hole in the Wall, and Pyramid Peak at 6,703 feet, 2,043 meters. South of the Funeral Mountains is Furnace Creek Wash, where the park boundary narrows for a time. Mountains south of Furnace Creek Wash include Mt Perry at 5,716 feet, 1,742 meters, Dantes View at 5,475 feet, 1,669 meters, Coffin Peak at 5,503 feet, 1,677 meters, and Funeral Peak at 6,384 feet, 1,945 meters. To the south of Funeral Mountains is Gold Valley. To the west and south of Gold Valley are the Black Mountains, the southernmost mountains of the Amargosa Range. From north to south, the Black Mountains' geographic features include Mormon Point, Smith Mountain at 5,912 feet, 1,802 meters, Jubilee Pass at 1,290 feet, 390 meters, and Jubilee Mountain. Salsberry Pass at 3,315 feet, 1,010 meters, lies east of Jubilee Pass with the Ibex Dunes several miles south, tucked in the southeast corner of the park.


Northeast of the Black Mountains, at about 4 o'clock, is the Greenwater Valley and farther east the Greenwater Range, which are mostly within the park boundary. Greenwater Range is split near its southern end by Deadman Pass at 3,263 feet, 994 meters. Slightly northeast of Deadman Pass is Brown Peak at 4,947 feet, 1,508 meters. Just east of this range is the Amargosa River, which runs along the park boundary here.


Running along the eastern side of the Amargosa Range is the southern section of Death Valley. From north to south, this area of Death Valley features the southern end of Salt Creek, Mustard Canyon, Badwater Basin, which is the lowest elevation in North America at 282 feet, 86 meters below sea level, the Amargosa River, Shoreline Butte, and Confidence Hills.


Southwest of Confidence Hills, along the Amaragosa River, are the Owlshead Mountains, at 5 o'clock on the map. These mountains make a semi circle shape arcing from the west near the park boundary, north toward Shoreline Butte, then east and southeast past Confidence Hills back toward the park boundary. Within these mountains are higher elevations and a ridge going straight through the middle of the semi-circle feature flanked by two dry lakes. Lost Lake to the east and Owl Lake to the west. Together, these features look like the shape of an owl's head with its beak straight down the middle and the dry lakes serving as the owl's eyes, hence the name Owlshead Mountains. To the northwest within the park boundary is the southern side of Wingate Wash.


At 6 o'clock is the southern end of the Panamint Range. Its geographic features within the park include, from the north  near Stovepipe Wells, to the south is, Tucki Mountain at 6,732 feet, 2,052 meters, Harrisburg, Aguereberry Point at 6,433 feet, 1,961 meters, Emigrant Pass at 5,318 feet, 1,621 meters, Trail Canyon, the east side, Nemo Canyon on the west side, Wildrose Peak between at 9,064 feet, 2,763 meters. South of Nemo Canyon is Wildrose Canyon, to the east, Rogers Peak at 9,994 feet, 3,046 meters, and Bennett Peak. To the east, Death Valley Canyon, and Hanuapah Canyon. Further south,  Telescope Peak at 11,049 feet, 3,368 meters, Sentinel Peak at 9,636 feet, 2,937 meters, Johnson Canyon, and Porter Peak 9,101 feet, 2,274 meters, with the eastern side of Surprise Canyon and Pleasant canyons on the west and Johnson and Galena Canyons on the east.  Further south within Death Valley is Warm Spring Canyon, Butte Valley framed by Striped Butte at 4,773 feet, 1,455 meters. Goler Canyon, Anvil Spring Canyon, and Manly Peak sit at the park's boundary at 7,196 feet, 2,193 meters. To the east is Mengel Pass at Goler Canyon, Needle Peak at 5,804 feet, 1,769 meters, and finally Sugarloaf Peak at 4,820 feet, 1,469 meters. Except Goler Canyon and Butte Valley, all these canyons generally run east to west down the slopes of the southern Panamint Range. The southern end of the Panamint Range meets the northern side of Wingate Wash.


Geographic features outside the park boundary in this southeast quadrant of the map are an unidentified peak at a height of 3,040 feet, 927 meters and Eagle Mountain at 3,806 feet, 1,160 meters, both located at about 4 o'clock. Just north of Eagle Mountain is the Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, inside of which is a little piece of park property called Devils Hole. The Amargosa River runs south of Eagle Mountain and defines part of the park boundary. Further south is Ibex Pass at 2,072 feet, 632 meters. Wrapping around the park's southernmost border, heading west to 5 o'clock are the Quail Mountains, which wrap upward toward the 6 o'clock boundary of the park and the Panamint Range. The Quail Mountains include Brown Mountain at 5,125 feet, 1,562 meters and northwest of there Wingate Pass at 1,969 feet, 600 meters. Further north and a little west begins the southern end of the Panamint Range, which features Goler Canyon, Pleasant Canyon, and Surprise Canyon. Finally, south of here at 6 o'clock is the eastern side of Slate Range.


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MAP. Geographic Features. Southwest Quadrant

With Stovepipe Wells Village at the approximate center of the park and the brochure, only about one-third of this southwest quadrant has areas within the park boundary. 


At six o'clock, the park boundary starts about halfway up this quadrant and cuts northwestward at about a 45-degree angle through a southern part of the Panamint Range, including Wildrose Canyon and Nemo Canyon, to the northernmost parts of Panamint Valley.  The western halves of Surprise Canyon and Pleasant Canyon are outside the park boundary at six o'clock. The park boundary then heads west past Rainbow Canyon, which lies within the park, and then wraps northward around Darwin Plateau, also within the park. North of here, the park boundary runs between Santa Rosa Flat to the west and Lee Flat to the east then bisects the Nelson Range, most of which is within the park boundary in this quadrant of the park map. Finally, the Inyo Mountains begin west of the Nelson Range and is mostly outside the park boundary.


The map legend and brochure text sit at 7 to 8 o'clock covering a broad area west of Searles Valley and Panamint Valley, south of Darwin Hills and Lower Centennial Flat, and east of Rose Valley and the Sierra Nevada mountain range. There are no significant geographic features identified south of the map legend.


Near Stovepipe Wells at the center of the park map is a southern segment of the Panamint Range, the Panamint Valley running along the southwestern side of the range, and Panamint Dunes within the northern part of Panamint Valley.


The major geographic features within this southwest quadrant of the park, from north to south, are the western halves of Nemo, Wildrose, Surprise, and Pleasant canyons. South of Pleasant Canyon is Slate Range. Straw Peak is in this range's southern area at a height of 5,591 feet, 1,704 meters. Searles Valley is to the west and includes Searles Lake, dry. The Slate Range extends into the northwest, ending between Searles Lake, dry, and the southern end of Panamint Valley and Pleasant Canyon to the northeast.


Running north, from about seven-thirty to nine o'clock on the park map, is the Sierra Nevada mountain range. Its ridges are colored in green and purple to show higher elevations. Owens Peak is near this range's southern end with a height of 8,453 feet, 2,576 meters. Just south of Owens Peak is Freeman Canyon.


A little farther north from Owens Peak, at about seven-thirty on the park map, the Los Angeles Aqueduct butts up against the east side of the Sierra Nevada mountain range. A few miles east of the aqueduct is Little Lake and, just to the north of the lake, Rose Valley. Continuing north, South Haiwee Reservoir and North Haiwee Reservoir lie at eight o'clock on the park map.


Further north, near nine o'clock on the park map, is a second label for the Los Angeles Aqueduct as it continues along the Sierra Nevada range. Owens Lake, dry, and the southern half of Owens Valley are to the east of the aqueduct.


Turning to the southeast from Owens Valley is Lower Centennial Flat. Continuing east from Lower Centennial Flat is Darwin Hills then Panamint Valley and, beyond the valley, part of the Panamint Range. The eastern side of Panamint Valley meets the western ends of Wildrose Canyon and Nemo Canyon, which are within the Panamint Range and running back across the six o'clock portion of the park map.


Heading east from Owens Lake, dry, in Owens Valley, is the southern part of the Inyo mountain range, which includes, north to south, Cerro Gordo Peak at 9,184 feet, 2,799 meters, Conglomerate Mesa, Malpais Mesa, and Talc City Hills, which end between Lower Centennial Flat and Darwin Hills. East of these mesas is Santa Rosa Flat. These lie mainly outside the park boundary.


Just northeast of Santa Rosa Flat, and inside the park boundary, are Lee Flat then the southern half of Nelson Range. Farther east, just northwest of Panamint Dunes, is South Pass with a height of 5,997 feet, 1,828 meters. Slightly northeast of South Pass is Hunter Mountain at 7,454 feet, 2,272 meters. Continuing east are the southern portions of the Cottonwood Mountains and Cottonwood Canyon, which runs southwest to northeast from the Cottonwood Mountains to across the Panamint Range into the northwest quadrant of the park map.


Southeast of Santa Rosa Flat is Darwin Plateau. Immediately southeast of Darwin Plateau is Rainbow Canyon, which snakes eastward into Panamint Valley and northward toward the Panamint Dunes. In the northern part of Panamint Valley is Lake Hill with a height of 2,030 feet, 619 meters. A few miles northeast of Lake Hill is Panamint Butte at 6,584 feet, 2,007 meters. Continuing northeast from Panamint Butte is Lemoigne Canyon, which looks like an inchworm mid-crawl. Southeast of Panamint Butte is Towne Pass at 4,965 feet, 1,511 meters, then Pinto Peak at  7,508 feet, 2,288 meters. Northeast of Towne Pass and Pinto Peak is Jayhawker Canyon, which curves gently south to north toward Lemoigne Canyon and is within the Panamint Range.

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MAP. Geographic Features. Northwest Quadrant

With Stovepipe Wells Village at the approximate center of the park and the brochure, clockwise from nine o'clock to twelve o'clock is the northwest quadrant. The park boundary rides the eastern side of the Inyo Mountains northward. 


Outside the park boundary, at nine o'clock, is the northern part of Owens Valley then, going north, the Inyo Mountains, which includes, south to north, New York Butte with a height of 10,668 feet, 3,252 meters, Mount Inyo at a height of 11,107 feet, 3,385 meters, then Willow Creek, which runs east to west over the Inyo Mountains toward the park boundary at Saline Valley. Farther north is Waucoba Mountain at a height of 11,123 feet, 3,390 meters.


At the northern end of the Inyo Mountains, just beyond where the park boundary changes from due north to northeast, is Joshua Flats, which hugs the park boundary. Northwest of Joshua Flats is the roughly circular shaped Deep Springs Lake in Deep Springs Valley. Continuing north along Deep Springs Valley with a slight turn east are Wyman Creek and Cottonwood Creek. Between these two creeks, heading east across Deep Springs Valley, is the northern tip of the Inyo Mountains and Chocolate Mountain at 11,123 feet, 3,390 meters. These geographic features all lie outside the park boundary.


Approaching eleven o'clock are Fish Lake Valley and, slightly to this valley's southeast, the Sylvania Mountains, which border the park's northernmost points and are outside the park boundary. The California Nevada border bisects the Sylvania Mountains.


From the Sylvania Mountains, the park boundary angles sharply southeastward, following the straight line of the California Nevada border. Northeast of the Sylvania Mountains are the Palmetto Wash and the Palmetto Mountains, with Palmetto Mountain at 8,960 feet, 2,731 meters, and, southeast of Palmetto Mountain, Magruder Mountain at 9,045 feet, 2,731 meters. South of Magruder Mountain, running north to south into the park boundary, is Tule Canyon.


Due east of the Palmetto Mountains is Jackson Ridge with Mount Jackson at 6,411 feet, 1,954 meters. To the northeast, off Jackson Ridge, are the Cuprite Hills. This leads you to the northernmost part of the park at twelve o'clock. South of Jackson Ridge and east of Magruder Mountain is Lida Valley.  South of Lida Valley is Slate Ridge, which includes Mount Dunfee on its northern side approaching Lida Valley. South of Slate Ridge is Gold Mountain. Finally, further south toward the center of the park map at the twelve o'clock line is Bonnie Claire Flat. Again, these geographic features are outside the park boundary.


Within the park boundary, starting back at nine o'clock on the park map are, east to west, the northern part of the Nelson Range then Racetrack Valley running north to south with a peak called the Grandstand and Ubehebe Peak with a height of 5,678 feet, 1,731 meters. Tucked between Racetrack valley and Hidden Valley is Ulida Flat. East of Hidden Valley is Sand Flat then the northern part of the Cottonwood Mountains in the northern part of the Panamint Range. From the Panamint Range, Marble Canyon merges northeast into the northern part of Cottonwood Canyon before the land levels out to Mesquite Flat then Death Valley, which is at the heart of the park map.


Just northwest of Mesquite Flat, in Death Valley, is the Death Valley Wash. To the northeast of Death Valley Wash are the northwestern part of the Grapevine Mountains, including the southwestern tip of Red Wall Canyon.


Heading back west to the park boundary, to the north and slightly west of the Nelson Range is Saline Valley, with the Saline Valley Dunes rippling westward toward the park boundary. Just southeast of the Saline Valley Dunes in Saline Valley is Salt Lake, which is shaped like a small bird flying west toward the park boundary. The Saline Valley arcs slightly from southeast to northwest. North of Saline Valley is Waucoba Wash then Jackass Flats.


West of Jackass Flats is North Pass, part of the Inyo Mountains inside the park boundary, at 7,300 feet, 2,225 meters elevation. North of North Pass, in the westernmost part of the park, is Cowhorn Valley. The park boundary separates Cowhorn Valley from Joshua Flats, which lies outside the park. A little further north of Jackass Flats is the gently curving Marble Canyon, which feeds up into the northern part of the Saline Range.


Where the Saline Range meets Eureka Valley to the north you will find sand dunes, unnamed. Eureka Valley's northern portion is outside the park boundary. Southeast of these sand dunes are the Eureka Dunes. South of the Eureka Dunes is Steel Pass.


The Last Chance Range rises up in the middle of this quadrant of the park map, stretching from Uhehebe Peak in the south near nine o'clock to Cucomungo Canyon to the north and slightly west, which is the park's northernmost boundary. On the other side of Cucomungo Canyon outside of the park boundary are the Sylvania Mountains. From south to north the Last Chance Range features Uhehebe Peak near Racetrack Valley, Dry Mountain at 8,674 feet, 2,644 meters, southeast of Steel Pass, Hanging Rock Canyon to the east of Eureka Valley, and, approaching Cucomungo Canyon, Last Chance Mountain with a height of 8,456 feet, 2,577 meters, and, to the east, Last Chance Canyon.


Finally, heading north to south from the Cottonwood Mountains of the Panamint Range to the California-Nevada border are the following geographic features within the park boundary. A small area called Sand Flat which is to the west of the Cottonwood Mountains between the mountains and Hidden Valley, Dry Bone Canyon in the northern part of the Cottonwood Mountains, White Top Mountain with a height of 7,607 feet, 2,154 meter, which is just northwest of Dry Bone Canyon, Bighorn Gorge which parallels Dry Bone Canyon to the north, Tin Mountain with a height of 8,953 feet, 2,729 meters, which is slightly northwest of Bighorn Gorge, a flat area for the Death Valley Wash, and finally Grapevine Canyon which is at the northern end of the Grapevine Mountains and southwest of Bonnie Claire Flat, which lies outside the park boundary.


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MAP. Main Roads Leading to the Park

Several roads lead to the park. 


To enter the park on the eastern side from U S 95 in Nevada, you can take, going north to south, Nevada State Route two sixty seven, Nevada State Route three seventy four, California State Route one ninety, or California State Route one seventy eight. To enter the park on the western side from U S three ninety five in California, you can take, going north to south, Death Valley Big Pine Road, California State Road one thirty six, California State Road one ninety, or California State Road one seventy eight.


Going clockwise on the park map, Nevada State Route two sixty seven runs from Scottys Junction to Scotty's Castle Visitor Center and Museum. Nevada State Route three seventy four runs from Beatty to California State Route one ninety, Stovepipe Wells Village, and points west. California State Route one ninety runs from Death Valley Junction to Furnace Creek and points in all directions. California State Route one seventy eight runs from Shoshone to Badwater Road, which heads north to California State Route one ninety and Furnace Creek. California State Route one twenty seven runs along the park's southeast boundary to Shoshone and branches off to roads leading to Tecopa and Las Vegas and, further south, to Barker and Interstate 15.


Southwest of the park are several major roads. From Lake Isabella, off the map,  California State Road one seventy eight connects to California State Road 14, which runs north south. California State Road one seventy eight overlaps California State Road 14 for a short distance then continues east, where it connects to U S three ninety five. U S three ninety five leads southeast to San Bernadino and northwest to California State Road 14. Crossing U S three ninety five, California State Road one seventy eight becomes B R three ninety five, which turns sharply from east to south to the town of Ridge crest. California State Road one seventy eight the continues northeast past the town of Trona and farther north Panamint Valley Road, off to the northwest, and then curves northeast into the park as Wildrose Canyon Road.


From U S three ninety five, heading north to the town of Olancha, past seven o'clock, the route splits to California State Road one ninety and leads to the park. Continuing north on U S three ninety five to Eastern Sierra Inter agency Visitor Center, which is just south of the town of Lone Pine, you can take California State Road one thirty six southwest past Keeler into the park, as it becomes California State Road one ninety. U S three ninety five continues northwest past the town of Lone Pine to Manzanar, Bishop, and Yosemite, off the map.


Continuing clockwise past the Inyo Mountains an unidentified road from Big Pine, at about ten o'clock, hugs the park's northwest boundary and turns into Death Valley Big Pine Road as it enters the park. Further north, California State Road one sixty eight leads north from Big Pine, off the map, to California State Road two sixty six. California State Road two sixty six runs west from Dyer, off the map, past Lida to Lida Junction, where it ends and intersects with U S 95 at twelve o'clock on the map. Two access points from California State Road one sixty eight and California State Road two sixty six, near where these roads meet, lead to an unpaved road that turns to a high-clearance road then a four-wheel-drive road. This leads south into the park at Cucomungo Canyon and becomes North Eureka Valley Road inside the park. East of here on California State Road two sixty six before Lida at Palmetto Wash, another four-wheel-drive road leads south through Cucomungo Canyon into the park and meets up with North Eureka Valley Road inside the park. At Lida, a four-wheel-drive road heads south past Magruder Mountain and continues west at a split heading into the park approaching Crankshaft Junction inside the park. Heading south from this split the road briefly becomes high-clearance then meets up with another high-clearance road that enters the park approaching Death Valley Big Pine Road by way of another four-wheel-drive road. Just east of Lida, an unpaved road leads to Gold Point. Just west of Lida Junction a paved road leads to Gold Point, making a triangle of roads in Lida Valley. From Gold Point, a road where high-clearance vehicles are recommended heads southwest into the park, where it turns into a four-wheel-drive road that enters the park past Tule Canyon, approaching Death Valley Big Pine Road.

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MAP. Towns and Other Areas Outside the Eastern Half of the Park

U S 95, from twelve o'clock to 3 o'clock on the park map, leads from Tonopah and Reno, off the map, past the towns of Lida Junction, Scottys Junction, Beatty, and Lathrop Wells to Las Vegas, off the map. Lida Junction to Scottys Junction is 16 miles, 26 kilometers. Scottys Junction to Beatty is 35 miles, 56 kilometers. Beatty to Lathrop Wells is 29 miles, 46 kilometers.


At Lida Junction U S 95 intersects with Nevada State Road two sixty six.


At Scottys Junction U S 95 intersects with Nevada State Route two sixty seven. From Scottys Junction southwest to Scotty's Castle Visitors Center and Museum, inside the park, is 26 miles, 42 kilometers, via Nevada State Route two sixty seven. Splitting off Nevada State Route two sixty seven is a four-wheel-drive road that leads to other roads inside the park. At a four-way intersection, this four-wheel-drive road heads west further into the park, east as a high-clearance road to meet back up with U S 95 at Oasis Valley, or south as a high-clearance road to Nevada State Road three seventy four. The high-clearance road leading to U S 95 also splits off outside the park to another high-clearance road that briefly goes back over the park boundary at Bullfrog Hills then meets up with the south-heading high-clearance road on the other side of Bullfrog Hills. From here, a short high-clearance, four-wheel-drive road inside the park merges with both roads outside of the park, and they form one high-clearance road that leads to a short paved road. This short paved roads meets up with another paved road that runs north to south from Rhyolite, ghost town, past a mine, to Nevada State Route three seventy four.


At Beatty, there are services for gas, stores, telephone, lodging, food, and an airstrip. Nevada State Route three seventy four leads southwest from Beatty past a mine and Rhyolite, ghost town,  to the north then turns into Daylight Pass Road just outside the park boundary. Daylight Pass Road continues southwest into the park, 19 miles, 30 kilometers, from Hells Gate. Where Nevada State Route three seventy four changes over to Daylight Pass Road, a one way, high-clearance road called Titus Canyon Road leads west into the park. From where it splits off Nevada State Route three seventy four to the trailhead for Fall Canyon is a distance of 24 miles, 39 kilometers. Where Daylight Pass Road meets the park boundary, a four-wheel-drive road splits off, heading southwest into the Amargosa Desert, where it connects to another four-wheel-drive road that leads southwest to Amargosa Farm Road and also branches off to other points inside the park. This four-wheel-drive road runs southwest from U S 95, starting about halfway between Beatty and Lathrop Wells, into the park, where it then splits into other routes inside the park.


Continuing southwest on U S 95 past Big Dune, Valley View Road branches off the highway due south, where it connects to Amargosa Farm Road. Amargosa Farm Road, connects to an un-named four-wheel-drive road that splits southward into the park and northward to another four-wheel-drive road that leads north back to U S 95 and south into the park. From the four-wheel-drive road, Amargosa Farm Road heads due south then sharply turns due east past Valley View Road to the town of Amargosa Valley at Nevada State Route three seventy three.


Nevada State Route three seventy three runs north-to-south for 27 miles, 37 kilometers, between Lathrop Wells, which has gas station service, past the town of Amargosa Valley, to Death Valley Junction in California. As Nevada State Route three seventy three crosses the border between Nevada and California, it becomes California State Route one twenty seven. At the state border, there is service for telephone, lodging, and food. Just north of the border, due east off Nevada State Route three seventy three, is an unpaved road leading to Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge. Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge has a Visitor Center and Refuge Headquarters as well as restrooms and drinking water. The unpaved road through Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge leads north to Devils Hole, which is part of Death Valley National Park, or south past Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge to State Line Road. State Line Road heads east to Pahrump and Las Vegas or west over the Nevada California border to meet up with other main roads at Death Valley Junction.


Nevada State Route three seventy three, California State Route one twenty seven lead south to Death Valley Junction. State Line Road enters Death Valley Junction from the east while California State Route one twenty seven continues south through Death Valley Junction, sometimes along the park boundary, to the town of Shoshone. Death Valley Junction has the Amargosa Opera House and services for telephone, lodging, and food. An area of Timbisha Shoshone trust lands lie to the west of Death Valley Junction. California State Route one ninety runs 18 miles, 29 kilometers, from Death Valley Junction into the park until converging with Furnace Creek and Badwater Road. Just before entering the park, an unidentified peak with a height of 3,040 feet, 927 meters, is just to the north off California State Route one ninety.


California State Route one twenty seven continues from Death Valley Junction for 28 miles, 45 kilometers, passing Eagle Mountain then running along the park boundary until meeting California State Route one seventy eight, just north of Shoshone. California State Route one seventy eight heads west into the park, eventually meeting Badwater Road, northwest route, Harry Wade Road, southeast route, inside the park. From California State Route one seventy eight, California State Route one twenty seven leads a short distance to Shoshone, which has services for gas, lodging, food, and an airstrip. An unnamed road leads due east from Shoshone to Pahrump and Las Vegas, off the map.


Continuing south from Shoshone along California State Route one twenty seven leads to a four-wheel-drive road that arcs north westward toward the park, ending at the park boundary. California State Route one twenty nine continues south, where an unnamed road splits off to Tecopa and Las Vegas, off the map, then past Ibex Pass. Just south of here, a four-wheel-drive road leads into the park. From Shoshone to the southeastern tip of the park boundary is a distance of 24 miles, 39 kilometers, along California State Route one twenty seven. California State Route one twenty seven then continues to Baker and Interstate 15, off the map.


Heading due east from the park's southeastern most point, a high-clearance and four-wheel-drive road bulge out of the park boundary for a few miles before returning back inside at Owlshead Mountains. Outside the park boundary there are no roads shown, but the Fort Irwin Military Reservation and, further west, the Naval Air Weapons Station China Lake are identified.

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MAP. Towns and Other Areas Outside the Western Half of the Park

Nevada State Route two sixty six, from twelve o'clock heading west on the park map, leads from U S three ninety five at Lida Junction, passes Gold Point, Lida, and California State Road one sixty eight. From Lida Junction to California State Road one sixty eight along California State Road two sixty six is a distance of 45 miles, 72 kilometers. At Jackson Ridge, an un-named paved road splits off California State Road two sixty six to Gold Point. East of Lida, an un-named unpaved road also splits off California State Road two sixty six to Gold Point. From Gold Point, a high-clearance road runs southwest into the park, where it changes to a four-wheel-drive road that connects with Death Valley Big Pine Road. From Lida a four-wheel-drive road heads south along Tule Canyon into the park, splitting briefly into a high-clearance road that joins the one from Gold Point that leads into the park. West of Lida at the Palmetto Wash, a high-clearance road passes Cucomungo Canyon at the park boundary then connects with North Eureka Valley Road inside the park. Continue the high-clearance road north, and it becomes a high-clearance road then an unpaved road the splits west to join California State Route one sixty eight or north to join Nevada State Route two sixty six. Nevada State Route two sixty six heads north to Dyer, off the map. California State Route one sixty eight heads southwest to Big Pine, off the map.

Another paved road, unidentified, from Big Pine south of California State Route one sixty eight is at about 10 o'clock on the map. It branches off to a high-clearance road that runs southeast into the park for 8 miles, 13 kilometers, to Marble Canyon. In winter, carry chains. Road may be closed. Continue northeast on the unidentified paved road from Big Pine for 23 miles, 37 kilometers, to Death Valley Big Pine Road, a high-clearance road that leads into the northern part of the park.

South of here at nine o'clock on the map enters U S three ninety five and an un-named paved road that connects to U S three ninety five at the town of Lone Pine. U S three ninety five north from Lone Pine leads to Manzanar, Bishop, and Yosemite. Lone Pine has services for gas, stores, telephone, lodging, food, drinking water, and an airstrip. Take three ninety five south from Lone Pine a short distance to Eastern Sierra Inter agency Visitor Center. From Eastern Sierra Inter agency Visitor Center it is 21 miles, 40 kilometers, along U S three ninety five to the town of Olancha. Olancha has services for gas, lodging, and drinking water. From Olancha, California State Route one ninety angles north eastward 15 miles, 24 kilometers, to meet California State Route one thirty six. From here, it is 18 miles, 29 kilometers, past Keeler back to U S three ninety five at the Eastern Sierra Inter agency Visitor Center.

At Keeler, a snaking, high-clearance road leads northeast past Cerro Gordo Peak to a four-wheel-drive road at the park boundary. The four-wheel-drive road continues southeast into the park as a high-clearance road that leads to Joshua Tree Forest while turning north on the high-clearance road ends at another four-wheel-drive road that slopes northward into the Inyo Mountains. From Joshua Tree forest, the four-wheel-drive road escapes the park boundary for a short distance the hugs the park boundary for eight miles, 13 kilometers, south along the Darwin Plateau until meeting up with California State Route one ninety.

Where California State Route one ninety meets California State Route one thirty six it is 33 miles, 53 kilometers, along California State Route one ninety into the park to Panamint Valley Road. California State Route one ninety passes an area of Timbisha Shoshone trust lands to the south before the road branches off to Darwin. From Darwin a four-wheel-drive road winds north eastward to California State Route one ninety near Panamint Springs inside the park. From the road that leads to Darwin, California State Route one ninety continues north to the park boundary at the Darwin Plateau. California State Route one ninety then winds east past Panamint Springs to Panamint Valley Road and beyond, inside the park.

The northern end of Panamint Valley Road at California State Route one ninety is briefly inside the park, then runs along the park boundary for 15 miles, 24 kilometers, to a point on California State Route one seventy eight. Heading north on California State Route one seventy eight takes you to Wildrose Canyon Road, which leads back into the park. Heading south on California State Route one seventy eight takes you to Trona-Wildrose Road away from the park.

Slightly south of the point where Panamint Valley Road meets California State Route one seventy eight is an unpaved road, un-named, that is roughly the shape of a semi-circle winding east toward Surprise Canyon, south toward Pleasant Canyon, then west back to California State Route one seventy eight, Trona-Wildrose Road. Where the unpaved road curves east to south is a four-wheel-drive road that branches northward into the park. Further south, a high-clearance road branches off and becomes a high-clearance road and hiking trail that leads through Surprise Canyon to Panamint City, a ghost town. Just south of here, there is another four-wheel-drive road that leads a short distance to the base of the Panamint Range. Further south is Ballarat, a ghost town. Heading east out of Ballarat is a four-wheel-drive road tracing Pleasant Canyon into the park, splitting into a loop, then winding back westward out of the park and connecting with an unpaved road heading south out of Ballarat, a ghost town. Where these roads meet, the four-wheel-drive road continues south several miles, passing Manly Peak to the east, then heading due east through Goler Canyon into the park. Continuing north on this road leads to Manly Peak, inside the park. From Ballarat, a ghost town, the unpaved, semi-circular road turns west toward California State Route one seventy eight, Trona-Wildrose Road.

Trona has services for gas, stores, telephone, food, and an airstrip.

Southeast of Trona along California State Route one seventy eight it is 25 miles, 40 kilometers, to Ridge crest. Ridge crest has services for gas, stores, food, lodging, telephone, drinking water, and an airstrip. California State Route one seventy eight continues southwest from Ridge crest to meet U S three ninety five. BR three ninety five heads due north then due west of Ridge crest to meet U S three ninety five. BR three ninety five then crosses U S three ninety five as California State Route one seventy eight, meeting California State Route 14. North of this section of California State Route one seventy eight, U S three ninety five meets California State Route 14. It is 13 miles, 21 kilometers, from Ridge crest along BR three ninety five then U S three ninety five to California State Route 14. U S three ninety five continues south past California State Route one seventy eight BR three ninety five to San Bernadino, off the map. California State Route 14 continues south to Sequoia and Los Angeles, off the map, and on the way picks up California State Route one seventy eight again, as it heads west through Freeman Canyon to Lake Isabella, off the map. California State Route 14 heads north, connecting to U S three ninety five, which leads back to Olancha. Where California State Route 14 meets U S three ninety five, it is 42 miles, 68 kilometers, to Olancha.


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MAP. Legend

The map legend in the bottom left corner of the page shows where to find paved roads, unpaved roads, four-wheel-drive roads, roads where high-clearance vehicles are recommended, hiking trails, and Timbisha Shoshone trust lands.


Paved roads are indicated with a single solid red line. Unpaved roads are a double solid red line. Places where high-clearance vehicles are recommended is shown with a double solid black line. Four-wheel-drive roads are a double broken black line. Hiking trails are a single broken black line. Timbisha Shoshone trust lands are shown with a solid pale green background inside the boundaries of these areas.


The legend's thirteen icons are silhouetted white images on black backgrounds in small square boxes with rounded corners. These icons refer you to specific map areas where you can find services, facilities, and amenities.

The ranger station icon shows the front of a one-door building with an angled roofline and an attached flagpole, its flag flying, just off-center from the rooftop.

The campground icon is represented by  the front of a small triangle-shaped tent with an open flap and base.

The sanitary disposal station icon is represented by the profile of an RV trailer with a rectangular window in its top left side, a square window in its top right side, and one wheel at the center of its base. Below the trailer is a white, underground, area with a black area in its left side and a white arrow in the black area that is pointing down.

The picnic area icon is represented by a picnic table, as if you were looking at its side.

The food service icon is represented by a fork on the left beside a knife on the right.

The lodging icon shows the side profile of a bed with a person's head and blanket-covered body on top. Features are indistinct.

The gas station icon is represented by an older-style gas pump with its hose and nozzle winding toward its top on the right side.

The store icon is represented by a half gallon container with a handle and cap on the right beside a whole apple with a detached leaf above it.

The telephone icon is represented by an older-style handset from a side view.

The wheelchair-accessible icon shows the International Symbol of Access, a profile view of an indistinct human figure seated on a tilted crescent that symbolizes a wheel chair.

The airstrip icon shows a full airplane body as if looking down on it from above.

The restrooms icon shows an indistinct human female figure on the left with an indistinct human male figure on the right. The two figures are separated from each other by a vertical line.

The water icon represents a full cup of water.


Reeding the map clockwise.

The following is a list of service categories and where they are found on the map. If you read the map like a page of text, north to south and west to east, you will find.

ranger stations are at Scotty's Castle, Stovepipe Wells Village, and Furnace Creek.

campgrounds are at Eureka Dunes, Mesquite Spring, Warm Springs, Homestake Dry Camp, Stovepipe Wells Village, Emigrant, Furnace Creek, Panamint Springs, Wildrose, Thorndike, and Mahogany Flat.

sanitary disposal stations are at Mesquite Spring, Stovepipe Wells Village, and Furnace Creek. 

picnic areas are at Scotty's Castle, Emigrant, Furnace Creek, and Wildrose Canyon Road.

food service is at Beatty, Lone Pine, Stovepipe Wells Village, Furnace Creek, near Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Panamint Springs, Death Valley Junction, Shoshone, Trona, and Ridgecrest.

lodging is at Beatty, Lone Pine, Stovepipe Wells Village, Furnace Creek, near Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Panamint Springs, Death Valley Junction, Olancha, Shoshone, and Ridgecrest.

gas stations are at Beatty, Lathrop Wells, Lone Pine, Stovepipe Wells Village, Furnace Creek, Panamint Springs, Olancha, Shoshone, Trona, and Ridgecrest.

stores are at Beatty, Lone Pine, Stovepipe Wells Village, Furnace Creek, Panamint Springs, Trona, and Ridgecrest.

telephones are at Grapevine, Beatty, Lone Pine, Stovepipe Wells Village, Emigrant, Furnace Creek, near Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, at the information area on route one ninety, Trona, and Ridgecrest.

wheelchair-access is at Scotty's Castle, Grapevine, Salt Creek Interpretive Trail, and Furnace Creek.

airstrips are at Lone Pine, near Stovepipe Wells Village, Furnace Creek, Shoshone, Trona, and Ridgecrest.

restrooms are at Eureka Dunes, Scotty's Castle, Grapevine, Mesquite Spring, Beatty, near Fall Canyon Trail, Warm Springs, near Hells Gate, near Kit Fox Hills, Stovepipe Wells Village, Salt Creek Interpretive Trail, Emigrant, Furnace Creek, Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Center and Headquarters, Zabriskie Point, Golden Canyon Trail, near the park's southeastern boundary off route one ninety, Artists Palette, Father Crowley Vista Point, Panamint Springs, Death Valley Junction, Natural Bridge, Wildrose, Thorndike, Mahogany Flat, Badwater, Dantes View, and Ashford Mill. 


and, finally,

water is at Scotty's Castle, Grapevine, Mesquite Spring, Lone Pine, Stovepipe Wells Village, Emigrant, Furnace Creek, Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Center and Headquarters, Panamint Springs, Olancha, Wildrose, and Ridgecrest.

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MAP. Main Roads inside the Park

Inside the park, California State Route one ninety is the main road that leads you to most park sites, facilities, trails, points of interests, and other roads. Tracing California State Route one ninety from east to west through the park will help you experience the park's major roads, trails, facilities, services, and sites along the way.

The main southern route off California State Road one ninety is Badwater Road, which leads out of the southern side of the park via California State Road one seventy eight.

California State Road one ninety is the main western exit from the park and leads to Olancha and U S three ninety five.

California State Road one seventy eight is the main southwestern exit of the park. California State Road one seventy eight merges with California State Road one ninety near Furnace Creek, and winds north then west toward Stovepipe Wells Village. California State Road one seventy eight / one ninety then heads west. To exit the park to the southwest from California State Road one seventy eight / one ninety at Emigrant, take Emigrant Canyon Road / Wildrose Canyon Road / Trona-Wildrose Road to the town of Trona. To exit the park to the southwest from California State Road one seventy eight / one ninety east of Panamint Springs, take Panamint Valley Road to Trona-Wildrose Road to the town of Trona. Either route will take you to Trona-Wildrose Road then the town of Trona, U S three ninety five, and California State Road 14.

The northern most exit from the park is via a high-clearance section of Death Valley / Big Pine Road. There are also four-wheel-drive roads that branch off Death Valley / Big Pine Road and connect to California State Road one sixty eight and Nevada State Road two sixty six near California State Road one sixty eight, the Palmetto Wash, Lida, and Gold Point.

The northeast exit of the park is Nevada State Route two sixty seven, which leads from Scotty's Castle Road to Scotty's Junction and U S 95.

Southeast of the Scotty's Castle area, Nevada State Route three seventy four, Daylight Pass Road, is another northeast exit from the Stovepipe Wells Village area of the park that leads to Beatty and U S 95.


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MAP. Road Details in the Southern Half of the Park

Entering the park from the southwest via California State Route one ninety

Entering the park from California State Route one ninety past Death Valley Junction, which is southeast of the park boundary, leads you past an information area just inside the park boundary. Telephone service and restrooms are at the information area.

Just past the information area is a paved road that heads south 8 miles, 13 kilometers, to an area for trailer parking then becomes Dantes View Road, which heads southwest to Dantes View. Vehicles longer than 25 feet, 7.7 meters, are not allowed on Dantes View Road. From the trailer parking area to Dantes View, via Dantes View Road, is 6 miles, 10 kilometers. Dantes View has restrooms. Dantes View is a height of 5,475 feet, 1,669 meters, and overlooks Death Valley and Badwater Basin. A tactile map of the vista from Dantes View is available at the Dantes View site.

At the trailer parking area of Dantes View Road, a high-clearance road leads southeast through Greenwater Valley for 28 miles, 45 kilometers, until reaching the park boundary. It has three access points to a fish-shaped, four-wheel-drive road off to the southwest a few miles from the trailer parking area. At the Brown Peak area, a four-wheel-drive road splits off and runs northeast past Deadman Pass and out the park boundary to meet up with California State Road one twenty seven. Also at the Brown Peak area, a four-wheel-drive road splits off and runs west through the park, looping around with a couple dead ends up north, like a tulip shape, in Gold Valley, approaching Smith Mountain. Where the high-clearance road meets the park boundary, it also meets California State Route one seventy eight, and follows it 6 miles, 10 kilometers, east toward California State Road one twenty seven and Shoshone. California State Road one twenty seven then loops north back to California State Road one ninety.

Past the information area off California State Road one ninety it is approximately 10 miles, 16 kilometers, northwest to Furnace Creek. On the south side of California State Road one ninety is a one-way half-loop unpaved road that leads to Twenty Mule Team Canyon then comes back out onto California State Road one ninety. The north side of the loop is the entrance; the south side of the loop is the exit. Across from here, off California State Road one ninety, is a four-wheel-drive road that stairsteps east to Hole in the Wall. Further northwest on California State Road one ninety is Zabriskie Point, which has restrooms.

Just past Zabriskie Point is a four-wheel-drive road that winds northeast through Echo Canyon and Funeral Mountains, passing Inyo Mine, then looping at the park boundary before continuing to points beyond. Road conditions beyond Echo Canyon require experienced four-wheel-drive drivers and a short wheelbase. After the loop at the park boundary, the four-wheel-drive road splits to a northeast route heading to US 95 and a southwest route heading back over the park boundary toward Indian Pass in the Funeral Mountains.

Badwater Road

Continuing northwest along California State Road one ninety is Badwater Road, a paved road which heads due south then meets Harry Wade Road and California State Road one seventy eight and Shoshone. The northernmost part of Badwater Road is a six-mile, 9-kilometer, stretch past Golden Canyon Trail, where there are restrooms, then past a short high-clearance road to Desolation Canyon to the east, then past the exit of one-way Artists Drive to an intersecting road called West Side Road. West Side Road runs west of Badwater Basin while Badwater Road runs east of Badwater Basin. Both roads generally follow a north-south direction along this section of Death Valley.

South of the turn for West Side Road, Badwater Road leads to the entrance of Artists Drive. Artists Drive is a one-way, half-loop, paved road. Vehicles longer than 25 feet, 7.7 meters, are not allowed on Artists Drive. Halfway along Artists Drive is Artists Palette, which has restrooms. Artists Drive exits to Badwater Road just north of West Side Road.

South of the entrance to Artists Drive, to the west, is an unpaved road to Devils Golf Course and the northern side of Badwater Basin in Death Valley. Continuing south is a short, unpaved road heading east to Natural Bridge, where there are restrooms. Badwater Basin is to the east of Badwater Road. Next is the town of Badwater, which has restroom, eleven miles, 17 kilometers, south of the northern entrance to West Side Road.

Badwater Road snakes south to Mormon Point to the east, then Smith Mountain to the east, then the southern entrance to West Side Road. From Badwater to West Side Road, heading south on Badwater Road, is 27 miles, 43 kilometers.

From West Side Road to California State Route one seventy eight along Badwater Road is 3 miles, 5 kilometers. Along this stretch to the west is Shoreline Butte and Ashford Mill, ruins, which has restrooms, and to the east is an unnamed four-wheel-drive road that approaches the Black Mountains.

Harry Wade Road and Saratoga Spring

South of California State Route one seventy eight, Badwater Road becomes Harry Wade Road, which runs from Confidence Hills southeast past Owlshead Mountains to the end of the park boundary. A high-clearance vehicle is recommended for Harry Wade Road. Be alert for flooding and deep sand.

From the northern point of Harry Wade Road to the entrance of an unnamed high-clearance road leading to Saratoga Spring is 20 miles, 32 kilometers. From Harry Wade Road at this entrance to Saratoga Spring is 4 miles, 6 kilometers, which heads due north then turns sharply east at Ibex Dunes on a curvy, short road to Saratoga Spring.

A few miles west of Saratoga Spring, a high-clearance road branches off Harry Wade Road and leads to two four-wheel-drive roads just south of Owlshead Mountains. Continuing straight from the high-clearance road leads to a short northwest four-wheel-drive road, partly outside the park boundary, that suddenly switches back to the east approaching Owl Lake, dry. Turning south, out of the park boundary, another four-wheel-drive road leads rises north toward Owl Lake, dry, then heads west back into the park toward Brown Mountain. As it approaches Brown Mountain, the road turns sharply to the northeast then hooks around as it approaches Lost Lake, dry.

From Harry Wade Road at the entrance to the road to Saratoga Spring to the southernmost tip of the park boundary at California State Route one twenty seven is six miles, nine kilometers.

West Side Road

Heading north from Harry Wade Road to Badwater Road is the southern entrance of West Side Road. A high-clearance vehicle is recommended for West Side Road. It is 40 miles, 65 kilometers, from where the north end of West Ride Road branches off Badwater Road at Artists Drive to where it meets back up with Badwater Road at an unnamed point north of Shoreline Butte.

Six four-wheel-drive or high-clearance roads branch off to the west off West Side Road. North to south, the first four-wheel-drive road leads west into Trail Canyon, passing Aguereberry Point to the north and approaching Wildrose Peak to the south. Continuing south on West Side Road, Devils Golf Course and Badwater Basin are to the east. The next four-wheel-drive road follows Hanaupah Canyon into the Panamint Range, approaching Telescope Peak. West Side Road then passes Eagle Borax Works, ruins, to the east then continues south to a four-wheel-drive road that follows Johnson Canyon toward Sentinel Peak and Porter Peak. The next four-wheel-drive road follows Galena Canyon, and not too much farther south is an unnamed four-wheel-drive road. West Side Road then begins to curve southeastward to meet Badwater Road.

Three miles, five kilometers, before Badwater Road, a high-clearance road branches eastward for eleven miles, eighteen kilometers, into Warm Spring Canyon. Almost mid-way, there is a short four-wheel-drive road that hooks south then west toward the start of Anvil Spring Canyon. The high-clearance road in Warm Spring Canyon then divides into three four-wheel-drive trails: the first, unnamed, heads north and slightly east, the second, unnamed, heads due northwest, and the third turns southwest into Butte Valley.

The four-wheel-drive road in Butte Valley forms a triangle just south of Striped Butte. The leg of the road immediately south of Striped Butte leads out of the park and runs a little ways along the park boundary as it approaches Manly Peak. The southern point of the triangle has an offshoot four-wheel-drive road that stops at the western side of Anvil Spring Canyon, approaching Needle Peak. From Butte Valley the four-wheel-drive road continues through Mengel Pass then into Goler Canyon, where it has a short offshoot east. Road conditions require experienced four-wheel-drive drivers. At the park boundary, this road turns sharply west out of Goler Canyon then sharply north back to an unpaved road that leads to Ballarat, ghost town, which is outside the park boundary.

Ballarat, a ghost town.

Four four-wheel-drive roads and one trail branch off the unpaved road at Ballarat, ghost town. The first loops from the southern end of the unpaved road eastward back into the park, where it switches back to the west then east before looping back east to the park boundary. Right at the park boundary is an offshoot: a little hook-shaped four-wheel-drive road that runs northeast and approaches Porter Peak. The main four-wheel-drive road continues through Pleasant Canyon, exiting the park, and leads back back to the unpaved road at Ballarat, ghost town. Just north of Ballarat, ghost town, is a short four-wheel-drive road, unnamed, and north of it off the unpaved road is a high-clearance road that briefly turns to a four-wheel-drive road before reaching a hiking trail at Surprise Canyon. Halfway through the canyon is the park boundary. The hiking trail heads east through Surprise Canyon and ends at Panamint City, ghost town, between Sentinel Peak to the south and Telescope Peak to the north. Around the northwest bend of the unpaved road from Ballarat, ghost town, is the fourth four-wheel-drive road, unnamed, which heads northeast into the park, approaching Bennett Peak.

Wildrose Canyon Road

Wildrose Canyon Road starts outside the park boundary north of the Ballarat, ghost town, area. It starts as a paved road into the park, then becomes an unpaved road just before meeting up with Emigrant Canyon Road. From Panamint Valley Road to where Wildrose Canyon Road meets Emigrant Canyon Road is nine miles, 14 kilometers.

Just east of Emigrant Canyon Road, where an unpaved part of Wildrose Canyon Road begins, is a snakelike four-wheel-drive road that heads slightly southeast approaching Bennett Peak. The unpaved part of Wildrose Canyon Road is rough, narrow, and winding. Vehicles longer than 25 feet, 7 point 7 meters, are not allowed.

Wildrose Canyon Road meets Emigrant Canyon Road at Wildrose, where Wildrose Canyon Road is again a paved road heading east into the park and the Panamint Range. Emigrant Canyon Road heads north toward California State Route one ninety and Emigrant.

Wildrose Canyon Road briefly turns to an unpaved road again as it passes a hiking trail to Wildrose Peak to the north then approaches Charcoal Kilns, slightly south of the trail.

Wildrose Canyon Road then briefly turns into a four-wheel-drive road, passing Thorndike, which has camping and restrooms, then switching sharply from south to north to Mahogany Flat. Mahogany Flat is at a height of 8,133 feet, 2,479 meters, and has camping and restrooms.

A hiking trail curves south from Mahogany Flat past Rogers Peak to the west then past Bennett Peak to the east before ending at Telescope Peak.

Emigrant Canyon Road

At about at its midway point, Wildrose Canyon Road splits north to Emigrant Canyon Road. Where these roads meet is Wildrose, which has camping, restrooms, and drinking water. Emigrant Canyon Road is a paved road that heads northeast past Emigrant Pass then northwest at Harrisburg Flats, a geographic feature. Emigrant Canyon Road ends at California State Route one ninety. From Wildrose Canyon Road to California State Route one ninety is 21 miles, 34 kilometers.

Off Emigrant Canyon Road at Emigrant Pass is a four-wheel-drive road that leads slightly southeast toward Trail Canyon. North of here, an unpaved road off Emigrant Canyon Road leads to Eureka Mine. The unpaved road continues to Aguereberry Point with high-clearance vehicles recommended. Aguereberry Point has a height of 6,433 feet, 1,961 kilometers.

As Emigrant Canyon Road veers northwest, off to the northeast is a high-clearance road shaped like a backward C that leads to Skidoo, townsite.

Approaching California State Road one ninety, a four-wheel-drive road branches off to the north of Emigrant Canyon Road, turning sharply southeast then east toward Skidoo, townsite, and beyond. It ends facing Furnace Creek, with Death Valley in between.

Panamint Springs to Devils Cornfield

From the west, California State Route one ninety enters the park at the Darwin Plateau, geographic feature. California State Route one ninety heads east past Father Crowley Vista Point to the north, which has restrooms. Approaching Panamint Springs, a four-wheel-drive road splits off to the west and heads generally in a southwest direction, with some switchbacks and a short offshoot just outside the park boundary before ending at Darwin. Before leaving the park boundary, the four-wheel-drive road leads to a hiking trail. The hiking trail leads to Darwin Falls, inside the park boundary.

Past the four-wheel-drive that leads to Darwin Falls and Darwin, California State Route one ninety meets up with Panamint Springs. Panamint Springs has services for fuel, stores, lodging, food, camping, restrooms, and drinking water.

Continuing east on California State Route one ninety, Panamint Valley Road splits off to the south. From where California State Route one ninety and California State Route one thirty six meet, outside the park boundary, to where California State Route one ninety and Panamint Valley Road meet is 33 miles, 53 kilometers.

Panamint Valley Road heads south along part of the park boundary. Just outside the park boundary is a four-wheel-drive road that winds back along the park boundary and ends just inside the park boundary, facing the Wildrose Canyon area.

From California State Route one ninety to Wildrose Canyon Road along Panamint Valley Road is 15 miles, 24 kilometers.

Continuing east from Panamint Valley Road, then northeast, along California State Route one ninety, it is 18 miles, 29 kilometers, to Emigrant Canyon Road. At this interchange is a camping area, a picnic area, and Emigrant, which has services for telephone, restrooms, and drinking water.

North of Emigrant, branching off to the west, is a four-wheel-drive road that ends at Lemoigne Canyon in the Panamint Range.

From Emigrant Canyon Road heading northwest on California State Route one ninety to Stovepipe Wells Village is a distance of 8 miles, 13 kilometers.

Just west of Stovepipe Wells Village two unpaved roads split off California State Route one ninety, one to the south and one to the west. The unpaved road heading south from California State Route one ninety leads to Mosaic Canyon. A hiking trail leads from Mosaic Canyon and ends approaching Tucki Mountain. The unpaved road heading west from California State Route one ninety leads to an airstrip, just south of the unpaved road, then turns into a high-clearance road heading west through Death Valley and then north to the base of the Panamint Range. The road becomes a four-wheel-drive road that curves south then splits west into Marble Canyon or continues south through Cottonwood Canyon, ending at the Cottonwood Mountains.

Stovepipe Wells Villages has a ranger station and services for fuel, stores, telephone, lodging, food, camping, R V disposal, restrooms, and drinking water.

California State Route one ninety continues east through Death Valley from Stovepipe Wells Village, passing Sand Dunes Parking to the north. The Sand Dunes parking area is south of the Mesquite Flat Sand Dunes, geographic feature.

California State Route one ninety then heads northwest passing Devils Cornfield to the southwest.

Stovepipe Wells Village to Furnace Creek

Branching off California State Route one ninety to the northwest is Scotty's Castle Road, North Highway, a paved road which takes you to the northern areas of the park. From Scotty's Castle Road, California State Route one ninety continues southwest and takes you to the southwestern areas of the park.

Just off Scotty's Castle Road is Daylight Pass Road. From Stovepipe Wells Village to the south entrance to Daylight Pass Road is 9 miles, 14 kilometers.

From the south entrance to Daylight Pass Road to Beatty Cutoff, along California State Route one ninety, is 7 miles, 11 kilometers. This section of California State Route one ninety and a small portion of Scotty's Castle Road makes one side of a triangle of roads, the other two sides' being the southern part of Daylight Pass Road and Beatty Cutoff.

Before reaching Beatty Cutoff, California State Route one ninety passes Salt Creek Interpretive Trail to the south. An unpaved road leads to Salt Creek Interpretive Trail, which has restrooms and wheelchair accessibility.

Beatty Cutoff is a paved road southeast of Salt Creek Interpretive Trail, along California State Route one ninety. Beatty Cutoff leads due north for 10 miles, 16 kilometers, until it connects with Daylight Pass Road at Hells Gate. About mid-way along Beatty Cutoff, a gated, unpaved road splits off to the east, ending at Keane Wonder Mill and Mine.

From Beatty Cutoff, California State Route one ninety continues southeast then a more southerly direction to Furnace Creek, 12 miles, 19 kilometers. Just north of Furnace Creek, California State Route one ninety passes a half-loop, mostly unpaved road heading west then south through Mustard Canyon, geographic feature, where you will find to the south the Harmony Borax Works Interpretive Trail. Between the Harmony Borax Works Interpretive Trail and California State Route one ninety the road is paved.

The Furnace Creek area is detailed in a separate section.


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MAP. Road Details in the Northern Half of the Park

Daylight Pass Road.

Daylight Pass Road runs northeast from Scotty's Castle Road in California and through the park boundary in Nevada, where it becomes Nevada State Route three seventy four, ending at Beatty.

From Scotty's Castle Road to Hells Gate / Beatty Cutoff along Daylight Pass Road is 7 miles, 11 kilometers. Hells Gate has information and restrooms.

From Hells Gate / Beatty Cutoff to Titus Canyon Road, outside the park boundary, along Daylight Pass Road is 19 miles, 30 kilometers.

At the park boundary, a four-wheel-drive road splits off Daylight Pass Road to the southeast. The four-wheel-drive road meets up with a four-wheel-drive road that runs northeast to U S 95 and southwest back inside the park boundary, also inside the California state line, approaching Chloride Cliff. Continuing inside the park, the four-wheel-drive road turns west and splits again as a four-wheel-drive road that heads southwest and ends at Chloride Cliff. After the split the four-wheel-drive road turns northwest, with a short offshoot four-wheel-drive road heading southwest into the Amargosa Range, before meeting back up with Daylight Pass Road about mid-way between Hells Gate to the southwest and the California-Nevada border to the northeast.

From Daylight Pass Road, Nevada State Route three seventy four, Titus Canyon Road begins outside the park boundary then heads due west back into the park. Titus Canyon Road is a 27-mile, 43-kilometer, one-way, high-clearance road that begins at Daylight Pass Road and ends at a hiking trail for Fall Canyon then turns into an unpaved, two way road from Fall Canyon to Scotty's Castle Road. From Daylight Pass Road to the hiking trail at Fall Canyon along Titus Canyon Road is 24 miles, 39 kilometers. From the hiking trail at Fall Canyon to Scotty's Castle Road along Titus Canyon Road is 3 miles, 5 kilometers.

From Daylight Pass Road, Titus Canyon Road passes the Nevada California border then Lead field, a ghost town, to the south. It curves through Titus Canyon to Fall Canyon, which has restrooms. A hiking trail leads northeast from Titus Canyon Road into Fall Canyon. Titus Canyon Road then changes to an unpaved, two way road, ending at Scotty's Castle Road. Be alert for two way traffic from Scotty's Castle Road to the mouth of Titus Canyon on Titus Canyon Road.

Scotty's Castle Road, North Highway.

Scotty's Castle Road is also called North Highway. Scotty's Castle Road is a paved road that runs northwest from California State Road one ninety at Devils Cornfield to Ubehebe Crater.

Starting at California State Road one ninety at Devils Cornfield, Scotty's Castle Road heads northwest with Daylight Pass Road splitting off to the northeast. Just north of Daylight Pass Road along Scotty's Castle Road is an information area with restrooms. Further north along Scotty's Castle Road to the south is an unpaved road that leads to Historic Stovepipe Well, which is just northeast of Mesquite Flat Sand Dunes.

From Daylight Pass Road to Titus Canyon Road along Scotty's Castle Road is 14 miles, 23 kilometers. Titus Canyon Road branches off to the north as an unpaved road. Be alert for two-way traffic from Scotty's Castle Road to the mouth of Titus Canyon.

From Titus Canyon Road to Grapevine along Scotty's Castle Road is 19 miles, 31 kilometers, with the northern part of Death Valley paralleling the road off to the southwest and the Grapevine Mountains of the Amargosa Range paralleling the road to the northeast.

Before reaching Grapevine, a paved road splits off to the south and heads due south to Mesquite Spring. Mesquite Spring has services for camping, RV disposal, restrooms, and drinking water.

Scotty's Castle Road then reaches Grapevine, north of the turnoff for Mesquite Spring. Grapevine has services for telephones, wheelchair access, restrooms, and drinking water.

At Grapevine, a road splits off to the northeast, leading to Scotty's Castle Visitor Center and Museum. From Grapevine off Scotty's Castle Road to Scotty's Castle Visitor Center and Museum is 3 miles, 5 kilometers. Note that the Scotty's Castle Visitor Center and Museum area is temporarily closed due to flood damage. This road continues out of the park boundary right at the California-Nevada border as Nevada State Route two sixty seven. From Scotty's Castle Visitor Center and Museum to Scotty's Junction, U S 95, along Nevada State Route two sixty seven is 26 miles, 42 kilometers.

Mid-way between Grapevine and Ubehebe Crater is a high-clearance road that branches off to the north called Death Valley / Big Pine Road.

Past Grapevine, Scotty's Castle Road runs west for 5 miles, 8 kilometers, to Ubehebe Crater and ends as a loop.

Racetrack Road.

Continuing past the loop at the end of Scotty's Castle Road at Ubehebe Crater is a high-clearance road called Racetrack Road. Racetrack Road heads southward to Teakettle Junction for a distance of 20 miles, 32 kilometers. Be alert for sharp rock. This route requires heavy-duty tires.

At Teakettle Junction, the high-clearance road continues southwest through Hidden Valley, and a four-wheel-drive road spits off to the southwest toward Racetrack Valley.

The high-clearance road through Hidden Valley intersects with a four-wheel-drive road that runs a short distance to the west toward Racetrack Valley and a much longer distance to the east and northeast past White Top Mountain, geographic feature, approaching Bighorn Gorge and Tin Mountain to the north, geographic features. The high-clearance road continues south of the intersection through Hidden Valley. At Ulida Flat, two four-wheel-drive roads branch off, connecting with each other in a bend of the high-clearance road as it turns south to east past Ulida Flat. As the high-clearance road turns from east to south again, another network of four-wheel-drive roads head toward Sand Flat to the north and into the base of the Cottonwood Mountains to the east. These roads branch off at three locations along this stretch of the high-clearance road. The high-clearance road then becomes a four-wheel-drive road and carries an alert to carry chains in winter. Also be alert that in winter, the road may be closed. The four-wheel-drive branches off northwestward toward Ulida Flat, approaching Homestake Dry Camp and Racetrack Valley. Continuing due south along the four-wheel-drive road, it changes to a high-clearance road, with a short offshoot south toward higher elevation, then snakes southwest past Hunter Mountain to the north and South Pass to the south, geographic features.

At South Pass, the high-clearance road splits northwest to Saline Valley as Saline Valley Road and southwest toward Joshua Tree Forest.

From South Pass to Joshua Tree Forest along the high-clearance road is 7 miles, 11 kilometers. From this point to California State Route one ninety along the high-clearance road is 8 miles, 13 kilometers. The road briefly exits the park boundary, which cuts eastward briefly just south of Lee Flat, then follows the park boundary to California State Route one ninety. Back at Joshua Tree Forest, the high-clearance road also heads north past Lee Flat, and a short four-wheel-drive road on the north side of the Joshua Tree Forest creates a small triangle of roads. Past Lee Flat, the high clearance road branches off to two four-wheel-drive roads that look like deer antlers extending northward toward the Nelson Range. The high-clearance road then veers west approaching the park boundary and Cerro Gordo Peak, geographic feature outside of the park boundary. The high-clearance road traces the park boundary north into the Nelson Range before splitting off into two four-wheel-drive roads that lead outside the park boundary.

From South Pass along the high-clearance road, past Joshua Tree Forest, to a four-wheel-drive road leading into Racetrack Valley is 11 miles, 18 kilometers, about the mid-distance of this four-wheel-drive road; then, from the midway point of the four-wheel-drive road at Racetrack Valley to Teakettle Junction is another 7 miles, 11 kilometers. In winter, carry chains and note that road may be closed. The four-wheel drive road branches off to the northeast then back southeast to Homestake Dry Camp. Road conditions require experienced four-wheel drivers. Homestake Dry Camp has camping services and is located at the southern end of Racetrack Valley. Along the northern stretch of the four-wheel-drive road you will pass Racetrack Valley, geographic feature, the Racetrack, and The Grandstand, geographic feature, due east and Ubehebe Peak, geographic feature, due west. A hiking trail leads west from the four-wheel-drive road to Ubehebe Peak. Further north along the four-wheel-drive road at its bend northeastward to Teakettle Junction is a short four-wheel-drive road that shoots off to the northwest.

Where the four-wheel-drive road meets the high-clearance road leading to Saline Valley, it is 20 miles, 32 kilometers, from this point to an intersection along Saline Valley Road. This high-clearance road heads northwest to the park boundary, following the park boundary around Salt Lake, then winding northwest past the Saline Valley Dunes to the intersection with a high-clearance road that leads to Warm Springs. Warm Springs is several miles northeast of the intersection with Saline Valley Road. Warm Springs has services for camping and restrooms. Past Warm Springs, the high-clearance road turns into a four-wheel-drive road that extends mostly north past Steel Pass, through deep sand, and along the east side of Eureka Dunes. Road conditions require experience four-wheel drivers. The four-wheel-drive road becomes a high-clearance road named South Eureka Valley Road, as it heads due west on the north side of Eureka Dunes. Here you will find services for camping and restrooms. South Eureka Valley Road is a high-clearance road that leads northwest from Eureka Dunes to Death Valley / Big Pine Road and has one offshooting four-wheel-drive road that leads due west into the southern part of Eureka Valley toward Sand Dunes.

Back at the Saline Valley Dunes, Saline Valley Road continues north along the park boundary then inside the park boundary for 25 miles, 40 kilometers, to Marble Canyon as a high-clearance road. In winter carry chains and be alert that the road may be closed. At Marble Canyon, the road splits west and northwest for 8 miles, 13 kilometers, outside the park boundary to a paved road leading toward Big Pine, off the map, and east as a four-wheel-drive road into Marble Canyon then turning southwest into Jackass Flats. The four-wheel-drive road splits in Jackass Flats, heading south approaching Waucoba Wash and heading east toward the Saline Range then due south approaching the previously mentioned four-wheel-drive offshoot.

Death Valley / Big Pine Road

From Big Pine, off the map, a paved road passes the high-clearance entrance toward Marble Canyon and Saline Valley Road and becomes Death Valley / Big Pine Road inside the park border and it meets up with South Eureka Valley Road. From the high-clearance entrance to the entrance to South Eureka Valley Road is 23 miles, 37 kilometers. The paved road continues northeast from the Marble Canyon area along the park boundary, then it veers outside the park boundary toward Eureka Valley, then crosses the park boundary at Eureka Valley where it becomes a high-clearance road called Death Valley / Big Pine Road. To the north of Death Valley / Big Pine Road is North Eureka Valley Road, a four-wheel-drive road that leads due north to the park boundary at Cucomungo Cayon; the four-wheel-drive road splits off due east to the park boundary at Cucomungo Canyon and points outside of the park and splits northwest outside of the park on the western side of the Sylvania Mountains.

Continuing southwest on Death Valley / Big Pine Road, South Eureka Valley Road is to the south. Then Death Valley / Big Pine Road becomes a paved road that traces Hanging Rock Canyon and heads south around a piece of non-park land within the Last Chance Range, where Death Valley / Big Pine Road changes back to a high-clearance road to Crankshaft Junction. From South Eureka Valley Road to Crankshaft Junction along Death Valley / Big Pine Road is 11 miles, 18 kilometers.

At Crankshaft Junction, a four-wheel-drive road heads due north then splits northwest into Last Chance Canyon and generally northwest, like a rising ocean wave, outside the park boundary and into Nevada toward Tule Canyon and Slate Ridge.

From Crankshaft Junction Death Valley / Big Pine Road continues southwest as a high-clearance road for 8 miles, 13 kilometers, until it meets a four-wheel-drive offshoot road that heads north into Nevada and outside the park boundary toward Slate Ridge.

From the four-wheel-drive road, Death Valley / Big Pine Road continues southwest as a high-clearance road for 14 miles, 23 kilometers, to Grapevine, intersecting with Scotty's Castle Road between Ubehebe Crater to the west and Grapevine to the southeast.


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Maps. Three inset maps

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INSET MAP and TEXT. To Preserve a Way of Life

Map Caption. Timbisha, is the Shoshone word for Death Valley and the red rocks in the surrounding mountains. The Timbisha Shoshone have lived here for over 1,000 years. Trust lands have been set aside where they can live permanently in their ancestral homeland. These lands are shown by dots on the inset map and are also shown on the larger park map. The Timbisha Shoshone Natural and Cultural Preservation Area is jointly managed for the tribe’s traditional cultural and religious activities. To the left of the caption is a map.

Map.  A gray shape of Death Valley National Park. Within that shape is a smaller similar brown shape of the Timbisha Shoshone Natural and Cultural Preservation Area. Two dots sit above the park area, three dots sit across the middle of the map. One of these three dots is within the park boundary. 



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INSET MAP and TEXT. To Preserve Wilderness

DESCRIPTION. The shape of Death Valley National park is shown in a light green color with a dark green boundary line. Over top of that light green color, is a darker green color showing how much of the park is designated wilderness with the label, Death Valley Wilderness. Very few light green areas show outside of the dark green wilderness area. Just a few specs throughout the park, and a triangular area on the Nevada side of the park.

CAPTION. Ninety one percent of Death Valley National Park is designated wilderness, preserving opportunities to experience solitude, natural quiet, dark night skies, and wild nature. With solitude comes isolation, so you must be self-reliant for your own safety. You can get to the park’s vast wilderness along hundreds of miles of unpaved roads, but your vehicle must stay on the road. Backcountry maps are available at the visitor center and ranger stations. Other wilderness rules apply, so consult a park ranger before you explore.

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INSET MAP. Furnace Creek area

A detail map shows visitor features in close proximity to the Furnace Creek Visitor Center, which sits just above the middle of the inset map. This area is about 2 miles wide. The map is oriented with north at the top.

California State Route one ninety, a paved road, runs through the middle of the Furnace Creek area from the southwest corner of the map to the center of top, north. In the Furnace Creek area you will find visitor amenities and off shoot roads located on both sides of California State Route one ninety.

Heading south through the area from Stovepipe Wells along California State Route one ninety, a paved road to the west leads to a by sected loop of an area called Furnace Creek, which has services for camping and R V waste disposal.

Continuing south along California State Route one ninety, a paved road leads west to an airstrip and the Furnace Creek Visitor Center. Continue on the road to reach the airstrip or turn north off this road to reach the parking loop for the Furnace Creek Visitor Center. The Furnace Creek Visitor Center has a ranger station and services for wheel-chair accessibility, restrooms, and drinking water. South of the Furnace Creek Visitor Center is Furnace Creek Ranch.

Continuing south along California State Route one ninety, fuel services are to the west then a picnic area is further south along California State Route one ninety on the west. West of these areas is Furnace Creek Ranch.

Continuing south along California State Route one ninety is a road leading to the west where you will find a Post Office. Just west of the post office, the road intersects with another road leading south, where the Borax Museum is located on the west side. This road intersects with another road that leads west to the Furnace Creek Ranch area and east toward registration, lodging, and California State Route one ninety. Continuing south from the Borax Museum is an area for restaurants and a general store, which has stores, telephone, and food. From here, a paved road leads west toward the Furnace Creek Ranch area.

Continuing south along California State Route one ninety from the road leading to the Post Office, another paved road forms a Y shape off California State Route one ninety and leads to registration, lodging, the Borax Museum, and toward the Furnace Creek Ranch. At the Borax Museum this road is intersected by another paved road that runs south to north. To the north of the Borax Museum is the Post Office. To the south of the Borax Museum is are restaurants, a general store, and telephone services.

Continuing south along California State Route one ninety, where the road curves to the southeast, is an intersection with a paved road leading southwest to Timbisha Shoshone Village, private, which has food services, and northeast to two camping areas. Heading northwest to the two camping areas, the road splits. Northeast of the split, a paved road leads to the Texas Spring camping area, which loops into a curving network of paved roads and has R V disposal service. Northwest of the split, a paved road leads to the Sunset camping area loops. There is a south loop and a north loop, both with R V disposal service.

Continuing southeast along California State Route one ninety, the road bends to the northeast while another paved road splits to the southeast and leads to Artists Drive and Badwater.

Continuing northeast along California State Route one ninety to Death Valley Junction, a paved road splits off to the west and leads to Furnace Creek Inn, which has lodging and food service.


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