Adams National Historical Park

Audio Available:

OVERVIEW: About this audio-described brochure

Welcome to the audio-described version of the official print brochure for Adams National Historical Park. Through text and audio descriptions of photos, illustrations, and maps, this version interprets the two-sided color brochure that Adams National Historical Park visitors receive. The brochure explores the history of the park, some of its highlights, and information for planning your visit. This audio version lasts approximately 40 minutes which we have divided into 26 sections, as a way to improve the listening experience. Sections 3-10 cover the front of the brochure and include information regarding the contributions from the Adams family members and the history of the Historical Park. Sections 11-24 cover the back of the brochure which consists of building specific images and text, as well as information needed to plan a visit to the park. Section 25 covers Accessibility and 26 covers More Information. 

↑ back to top

OVERVIEW: Adams National Historical Park

Adams National Historical Park, located in Massachusetts, is part of the National Park Service, within the Department of the Interior. The park is situated approximately 13 miles south of Boston right off of the Red Line Subway (Braintree line). This park, established in October of 1966 as the U.S. National Register of Historic Place, November 1946 was re-established as U.S. National Historic Site, once again re-established as U.S. National Historical Park in November of 1998. Each year, there are 200,000 visitors on average come to enjoy the historical park. During your visit make sure to check out the guided tours and the parks' Visitor Center. To find out more about what resources might be available or to contact the park directly, visit the "Accessibility" and "More Information" sections at the end of this audio-described brochure.

↑ back to top

OVERVIEW: Front side of brochure

The front side of the brochure is broken up into three different sections; top, center, and bottom. The top of the brochure includes pictures and text describing The Great American Political Experiment. The center is a timeline including images, maps, and flags of when each member of the Adams family members lived along with their public contributions. The bottom of the page includes images and text of the history of the Adams National Historical Park.

↑ back to top

IMAGE: John Quincy Adams birthplace

IMAGE 1 of 2: John Adams birthplace

DESCRIBING: Rectangular color drawing of multiple buildings.

SYNOPSIS: Two buildings sit in the center of the image. Both buildings are brown, the one on the right darker, two-story, chimnies in the center, and multiple windows on the front and side. The building on the left is angled to the right of the image. A stone wall lines the front of the buildings separating them from a road. The road starts in the foreground and curves along a grassy area, with trees and bushes, in front of the buildings before continuing off the image to the right. In the distance are smaller buildings and green hills. 

CAPTION: John Adams birthplace 

CREDIT: NPS Adams National Historical Park collection


IMAGE 2 of 2: d John Quincy Adams birthplace

DESCRIBING: Rectangular color drawing of a single 3-story building.

SYNOPSIS: Three-story tan house with teal shutters and a canopy over the front door held up by white columns. The house is angled to the left. Ten large windows are on the front of the building and five on the side. Four chimneys line the roof with a railing-like structure on top. A white picket fence lines the front of the house and the foreground of the image. Larger dense trees fill the sides of the house with smaller thin trees and bushes in front.

CAPTION: John Adams' birthplace, The “Old House” at “Peace field”

CREDIT: NPS Adams National Historical Park collection

↑ back to top

TEXT: The great American political experiment

From the American Revolution to the Civil War, and from the industrial age to modern times, four generations of the Adams family confronted some of this nation’s greatest challenges in war and politics. They also achieved enormous successes in diplomacy, history, and arts and letters. The family history unfolds uncannily parallel to the nation’s rapid transformation from 13 disparate British colonies into a United States and a world power.

“I must study politics and war, that my sons may have liberty to study mathematics and philosophy,” wrote Revolution-era leader and second President John Adams. His prophetic words foretold both the Adams family public personas and America’s rapid growth. Indeed, his sons would study diplomacy, navigation, and commerce, and their sons studied history, art, and literature. “. . . America made the Adamses possible . . . and the Adamses expressed America,” historian Daniel J. Boorstin observed. Adams National Historical Park commemorates these men and women who dedicated their lives to developing and serving their nation. The park is the birthplace homes of Presidents John and John Quincy Adams. It is also the Old House at Peace field, home to the four illustrious Adams generations, from 1788 to 1927. It is as well the Stone Library whose 12,000 volumes—the breadth and depth of American and European thought—embodied the family’s intellectual prowess and the nation’s intellectual promise.

These legendary accomplishments might suggest that American power and progress were foregone conclusions. But rebellion and nation building, industrialization and developing a distinctive national culture were anything but foregone conclusions for a fledgling nation. They were the staggering accomplishments that these historic landscapes, structures, and library and museum collections commemorate.

↑ back to top

IMAGES and SIGNATURES: Abigail and John Adams

IMAGE 1 of 4: Abigail Adams portrait

DESCRIBING: Oval-shaped color portrait of a female.

SYNOPSIS: Oval-shaped color portrait of an older pale skinned female angled to the right, with her head facing forward. She has curly brown hair that peeks out from a white bonnet-like hat with ruffles on the end. She wears a straight face with a long defined nose, high eyebrows, and rosy cheeks. White lace shall drapes over a brown top with a high, puffy white collar. 

CREDIT:  Gifts of Mrs. Robert Homans, National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC


IMAGE 2 of 4: Abigail Adams signature

DESCRIBING: Cursive signature found on top of the image.

SYNOPSIS: Faint brown lines that write Abigail Adams in cursive. The letters to the name Abigail are mostly illegible and there are a few lines creating the name Adams. 

CREDIT: Massachusetts Historical Society

  

IMAGE 3 of 4: John Adams portrait

DESCRIBING: Oval-shaped color portrait of a male.

SYNOPSIS: Oval-shaped color portrait of a pale skin male angled to the left, with his head facing forward. He has puffy white and gray hair on both sides of his head with long sideburns, the top of his head is bald. He has no distinguishable facial expression with dark rounded eyebrows. He wears a black outer coat with large lapels. Under the jacket is a white caller filled with ruffles. 

CREDIT: Gifts of Mrs. Robert Homans, National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC


IMAGE 4 of 4: John Adams signature

DESCRIBING: Cursive signature found below the image.

SYNOPSIS: Faint brown lines the write John Adams in cursive. The letters in the name John do not attach to each other but do in the name Adams.  

CREDIT: Massachusetts Historical Society

↑ back to top

IMAGES, MAPS and TEXT: US territory growth from 1700-1946

IMAGE 1 of 6: 1700 flag

DESCRIBING: First rectangular colored flag. 

SYNOPSIS: Rectangular colored flag. A red plus sign centered expanding to both the top and bottom and left to right. White lines border the red plus sign and also create an X, from the top right corner to the bottom left corner and the top left corner to the bottom right corner. The rest of this rectangle is a dark blue. 

CAPTION: The Adams family’s devotion to the public interest runs like a scarlet thread throughout the tapestry of American history, said President John F. Kennedy. Flags and background maps to this genealogy show the growth of U.S. territory during the lifetimes of four generations of the Adams family.

CREDIT: Eastern National


IMAGE 2 of 6: 1776 flag

DESCRIBING: Second rectangular colored flag. 

SYNOPSIS: Rectangular colored flag. Seven red horizontal stripes, each stripe separated by a white stripe. In the top left corner is a blue square. In the center of the square is a circle of white stars.

CAPTION: John Adams 1735–1826, 2nd president of the United States m. 1764, Abigail Smith 1744–1818

CREDIT: Eastern National


IMAGE 3 of 6: 1800 flag

DESCRIBING: Third rectangular colored flag. 

SYNOPSIS: Rectangular colored flag. Eight red horizontal stripes, each stripe separated by a white stripe. In the top left corner is a blue square. In the blue square, fifteen white stars are spaced out on six columns, creating a pattern switching between three and two stars per column. 

CAPTION: Abigail “Nabby” Adams 1765–1813 John Quincy Adams 1767–1848, 6th president of the United States 1825–29 m. 1797, Louisa Catherine Johnson 1775–1852 Charles Adams 1770–1800, Thomas Boylston Adams 1772–1832

CREDIT: Eastern National


IMAGE 4 of 6: 1861-1865 flags

DESCRIBING: Fourth and fifth rectangular colored flags.

SYNOPSIS: One square and one rectangular colored flag. The square flag is red with a blue X outline with a small white line. There are three white stars on each of the sides and one in the center, totaling 13 stars. The rectangular flag has seven red horizontal stripes, each stripe separated by a white stripe. In the top left corner is a blue square. In the blue square, 35 white stars are evenly spaced in five rows and seven columns.

CAPTION: George Washington Adams 1801–1829, John Adams II 1803–1834, Charles Francis Adams 1807–1886. U.S. Minister at London 1861–1868 m. 1829, Abigail Brooks 1808–1889

CREDIT: Eastern National


IMAGE 5 of 6: 1900 flag

DESCRIBING: Sixth rectangular colored flag. 

SYNOPSIS: Rectangular colored flag. Seven red horizontal stripes, each stripe separated by a white stripe. In the top left corner is a blue square. In the blue square, 45 white stars are evenly spaced in six rows each row switches between eight and seven stars.

CAPTION: Louisa Catherine Adams 1831–1870, John Quincy Adams II 1833–1894, Charles Francis Adams Jr. 1835–1915, Henry Adams 1838–1918, Arthur Adams 1841–1846, Mary Adams 1845–1928, Brooks Adams 1848–1927

CREDIT: Eastern National


IMAGE 6 of 6: 1946 flag

DESCRIBING: Seventh rectangular colored flag. 

SYNOPSIS: Rectangular colored flag. Seven red horizontal stripes, each stripe separated by a white stripe. In the top left corner is a blue square. In the blue square, 48 white stars are evenly spaced in six rows and eight columns.

CAPTION: Adams National Historical Park created in 1946 to commemorate the men and women of the Adams family who dedicated their lives to the development and service of the United States.

CREDIT: Eastern National


RELATED TEXT: 

Flags and background maps to this genealogy show the growth of US territory during the lifetimes of four generations of the Adams family


MAP 1 of 3: 1700s map

DESCRIBING: First translucent map behind images.

SYNOPSIS: A faint-colored map of North America was placed behind other images. The one-third of the map on the right side is green and labeled the United States. The left side of the map is yellow and labeled Spanish North America. The top of the map is red and labeled British North America. Most labels are illegible. Smaller boundaries and labels are written all over the map. 

CREDIT: National Geographic Society


MAP 2 of 3: 1800s map

DESCRIBING: Second translucent map behind images.

SYNOPSIS: A faint-colored map of North America was placed behind other images. The right side and furthest areas on the left of the map are green. The center and most of the left side of the map are yellow. The top of the map is red and labeled British North America. Most labels are illegible. Smaller boundaries and labels are written all over the map. 

CREDIT: National Geographic Society


MAP 3 of 3: 1900s map

DESCRIBING: Third translucent map behind images.

SYNOPSIS: A faint-colored map of North America was placed behind other images. The entire center of the map is green with specific United States state names and boundaries. The bottom of the map is yellow and labeled Mexic. The top of the map is red and labeled Canada. Most labels are illegible. Smaller boundaries and labels are written all over the map. 

CREDIT: National Geographic Society

↑ back to top

IMAGES: Adams family portraits

IMAGE 1 of 8: John Adams

DESCRIBING: Oval-colored portrait of a male with grey hair with a green background.

SYNOPSIS: Oval-colored portrait of a white male around the age of 30. His body is positioned to the left with his heading facing forward. He makes no distinguishable facial expressions. The man’s hair is grey, flat on top with it expanding around his ears and neck. His neck is mostly covered by a white-collar. A black jacket sits high on his shoulders within clapping in the front.  

CREDIT: Massachusetts Historical Society


IMAGE 2 of 8: Abigail Adams

DESCRIBING: Oval-colored portrait of a female with darker hair and blue background. 

SYNOPSIS: Oval-colored portrait of a white younger adult female. Her body faces to the right with her head facing forward. She has a slight upward curve to her lips. Her dark brown hair is tied behind her head with a blue headband. She wears a white lace collar necklace with a v-shape neckline top. White lace is along the hem and the rest of the top is blue. 

CREDIT:  NPS / Adams National Historical Park Collection


IMAGE 3 of 8: John Quincy Adams

DESCRIBING: Oval-colored portrait of a male with strawberry blonde hair and reddish background. 

SYNOPSIS: Oval-colored portrait of a white male in his late 20s to early 30s. His body faces the right with his head facing forward. He has a slight smile on his face with teeth showing and a slender long nose. His eyebrows are a dark color with his hair being blonde that rests above his shoulders. He has a white shirt that creates a high collar with it tied into a bow. He wears a black jacket with the lapels sticking up. 

CREDIT: NPS / Adams National Historical Park Collection


IMAGE 4 of 8: Louisa Catherine Adams

DESCRIBING: Oval-colored portrait of a blonde-haired female with a black background. 

SYNOPSIS: Oval-colored portrait of a white young adult woman. Her body is angled to the right with her head facing forward. She has no distinguishable facial expression. The woman has dark eyebrows with strawberry blonde hair. Her hair has large circles creating large waves down to her shoulders. She wears a white lace-like top with a v-neck.

CREDIT: NPS / Adams National Historical Park Collection


IMAGE 5 of 8: Charles Francis Adams

DESCRIBING: Oval-colored portrait of a male with brown hair and tan background.

SYNOPSIS: Oval-colored portrait of a white male in his late 20s to early 30s. His body is angled to the left with his head facing forward. He makes no distinguishable facial expression. His reddish-brown hair is split down the middle with short waves traveling from his head, he has sideburns that extend to his sharp jawline. He wears a white shirt that the collar extends past his jaw. Above his shirt is a dark jacket with the lapels lifted in the back. 

CREDIT: NPS / Adams National Historical Park Collection


IMAGE 6 of 8: Abigail Brooks Adams

DESCRIBING: Oval-colored portrait of a female with black hair and a black background.

SYNOPSIS: Oval-colored portrait of a white young adult female. Her body is facing forward with her face angled to the left. She has a long neck, oval head, and full lips that create a shadow over her chin. Her hair is black, flat, shiny, and tied behind her head. She wears a reddish-black top with a thin white lace-like fabric that creates a low curved neckline below her sternum. A brooch or button rests in the center of her top. 

CREDIT: NPS / Adams National Historical Park Collection


IMAGE 7 of 8: Henry Adams

DESCRIBING: Oval, black and white portrait of a male with a darker grey background.

SYNOPSIS: Oval, black and white portrait of a white male. His body is positioned forward with his head angled to the right. He has a receding hairline that travels halfway up his head, short hair covers the rest that connects to a beard with a large mustache that covers most of his mouth. The man wears a white shirt with his lapels sticking out to the sides, a darker-colored tie, and a suit-like jacket. 

CREDIT: NPS / Adams National Historical Park Collection


IMAGE 8 of 8: Brooks Adams

DESCRIBING: Oval-colored portrait of male with white hair and a blue background. 

SYNOPSIS: Oval-colored portrait of an older white male. His body is positioned to the right with his head angled to the left. He has a receding hairline that travels halfway up his head, short white hair covers the rest of his head. The man has a long white mustache that covers his mouth. He wears a white shirt with his lapels sticking out to the sides, a black tie, and a black suit-like jacket with a flattened collar. 

CREDIT: NPS / Adams National Historical Park Collection

↑ back to top

IMAGE and TEXT: Presidential birthplaces

DESCRIBING: Black and white rectangular drawing of a landscape scene. 

SYNOPSIS: From the foreground to the back. Grasses and trees span the landscape until the center of the image. Five two-floor buildings are spread out along a dirt-like road. In the distance, three more buildings sit at the base of three large hills that protrude three-fourths of the width of the image. Behind everything, there are large buildings that have a haze set in front. 

CREDIT: NPS / Adams National Historical Park


RELATED TEXT: "It is but the farm of a patriot." – John Adams

The birthplaces of John Adams and John Quincy Adams are the nation’s oldest presidential birthplaces. They stand on their original foundations at the foot of Penn’s Hill, 75 feet apart.

John Adams, the nation’s second president, grew up in this rural setting —seven miles south of Boston and less than a mile from the sea—where his father Deacon John Adams farmed in summer and made shoes in winter.

After graduating from Harvard College and being admitted to the Massachusetts Bar, John Adams married Abigail Smith on October 25, 1764. The young couple moved into the farmhouse next to Deacon John’s. In this humble setting, the young lawyer cultivated his career in politics and law and drafted the Massachusetts Constitution. This “little cottage” was the birthplace of their oldest son and sixth president of the United States John Quincy Adams.

In this simple saltbox Abigail Adams, loving confidant and prolific correspondent to her often absent husband, assumed the role of “patriot on the homefront.” Abigail melted her pewter spoons to make musket balls for the Continental Army—see her bullet mold at right. The couple’s oldest son John Quincy Adams was truly a child of the American Revolution.

↑ back to top

IMAGES: Locket, pliers, and cradle

IMAGE 1 of 3: Locket

DESCRIBING: Colored image of a brass-colored necklace locket.

SYNOPSIS: Colored image of a brass-colored oval necklace charm with two loops at the top. The charm has a thick rope-like design around the exterior creating a frame for the image within. The sepia image inside the charm is of a woman sitting with a tree to her left. The seat has rounded ends with small lettering written. In the distance a large three-mast ship sails into the open waters. 

CAPTION: A locket and this cradle are from the park collection, which includes over 75,000 artifacts from all four generations of the Adams family.

CREDIT: NPS / Adams National Historical Park


IMAGE 2 of 3: Musket ball molder

DESCRIBING: Colored image of a set of metal pliers.

SYNOPSIS: Colored image of grey metal pliers with two rounded ends. The pliers have two long handles that criss-cross. The ends are hollowed out, when placed together they would create a ball-shaped object. 

CREDIT: NPS / Adams National Historical Park


IMAGE 3 of 3: Cradle

DESCRIBING: Colored image of a wooden bed for a child.

SYNOPSIS: Colored image of a wooden rocking bed for a small baby. The wood is a dark reddish-brown with a shin throughout. There is a roof-like covering over the top of the bed. Two rounded legs are found on opposite sides of it to allow a rocking movement. The bed has white sheets and a white pillow.  

CREDIT: NPS / Adams National Historical Park

↑ back to top

OVERVIEW: Back side of brochure

The backside of the brochure is broken into two parts. The top of the brochure has images and text about the National Historical Parks buildings and interiors. The bottom of the page includes images, maps of the park and surrounding area, and text about planning your visit.
↑ back to top

IMAGES and QUOTE: Inside the "Old House"

IMAGE 1 of 4: ”Peace field’s” ”Old House” and garden

DESCRIBING: Colored image of a house and surrounding environment.

N-DEPTH DESCRIPTION: Colored image of a three-floor light grey house set behind various plants and a building that is completed covered in leafy greens. The foreground has white and pink flowers with large amounts of greenery. The building is a tan-grey color with black window shutters. Each of the first two floors has five windows and the third floor or roof has three windows with two chimneys. Behind the building are taller leafy green greens that span into a baby blue sky.

CREDIT:  NPS / Adams National Historical Park Collection


IMAGE 2 of 4: Study

DESCRIBING: Colored image of office space.

IN-DEPTH DESCRIPTION: Colored image of office space with warm tones. The walls are a mix between tan and orange with redder hardwood floors. The center of the room has a large dark wood desk with books and papers across the top. A short black leather chair is placed under the desk. A smaller circular table to places directly next to the desk with a large book with browned papers laid on top. All three pieces of furniture are on top of a large dark red rug with intricate designs. To the right of the image is a brownish-yellow standing globe. Behind the globe is a white fireplace, the center to the bottom of it has a white granite border with a golden interior. There is a short fireplace screen in front. The top of the fireplace has a lip with various smaller objects and trinkets. To the left of the fireplace is a white window with a shade that covers a fourth of the top. In front of the window are a smaller rectangular table and another standing globe. The wall perpendicular to the window has a smaller wooden desk with a chair placed in front. Continuing to the right is a white door with another chair placed in front. Finishing off the image in the top left corner is a taller drawer dresser that almost reaches the ceiling. 

CREDIT: NPS / Adams National Historical Park Collection


IMAGE 3 of 4: Dining room

DESCRIBING: Colored image of a dining room.

IN-DEPTH DESCRIPTION: Colored image of a dining room with dark wood floors and light pink walls. The majority of the image is taken up by a rectangular dark brown wooden table with six chairs placed around it. The wooden chairs are the same color as the table with a dark green leather seat. In the center of the table is a blue and white bowl. A glass chandelier with two lights diverting off the center hangs above the table. Three other chairs are placed around the room against the wall. The right side of the image is a brick fireplace with a golden framed portrait above. In front of the fireplace is a small rectangular rug with intricate designs that is mostly white with red accents. To the left of the fireplace on the same wall is a white door. On the wall perpendicular are a much smaller golden framed portrait and a larger golden frame Below the larger of the two frames is a half-circular dark wood table with different trinkets on top.

CREDIT: NPS / Adams National Historical Park Collection


IMAGE 4 of 4: Stone Library

DESCRIBING: Color image of a two-floor library.

IN-DEPTH DESCRIPTION: Color image of a two-floor library with black and white tile-like flooring. The walls are covered in hundreds of books in all shapes, sizes, and colors. The wooden bookshelves are light brown wooded with a large gold framed portrait on the second-floor railings on each of the three walls. On each of the three walls is a window. Along the walls are various types of seating made out of black leather and smaller dark wooden pieces of furniture are placed between the seats. The center of the room has a long wooden table with chairs spread out around it. On the table is various books.  

CAPTION: The Stone Library’s 12,000 volumes include John Quincy Adams’s book collection.

CREDIT: NPS / Adams National Historical Park Collection


QUOTE: 

“I think to christen my Place by the Name of Peace field.” – John Adams

↑ back to top

IMAGE and TEXT: From working farm to country estate to National Historical Park

DESCRIBING: Colored image of a seal.

SYNOPSIS: Colored image of a vertical rectangle. The board of the rectangle is golden with small pertusions on each corner. The middle of the rectangle is an orangish-red color. Inside are two oak leaves with a ribbon that rounds the bottom of the leaves are stapped into the middle. There is indistinguishable writing within the ribbon. 

CAPTION: John Quincy Adams used this seal with his signature on the Treaty of Ghent, which ended the War of 1812.

CREDIT:  NPS / Adams National Historical Park Collection


RELATED TEXT:

Returning to a grateful nation in 1788 after years abroad as a diplomat and minister plenipotentiary, John Adams with his wife Abigail moved into a “very Genteel Dwelling House” on 75 acres just over a mile from their humble farmhouse. “I think to christen my Place by the Name of Peace field,” John Adams wrote, “in commemoration of the Peace which I assisted in making in 1783 …” He continued to serve his country as the first vice president and second president of the United States. He and Abigail spent their retirement years living here year-round. Their descendents would only summer at what they affectionately called the “Old House,” today’s “Old House” at “Peace field.” In time “Peace field” was changed from a working farm to a country estate as farming gave way to horticulture. John Quincy Adams found great satisfaction and comfort in planting trees and lived by the motto “he plants for future generations.” His son Charles Francis Adams transformed his grandmother’s kitchen garden into a formal flower garden bounded by the ancient boxwood hedge. By 1927 Brooks Adams, the last family member to live in the house, had set the stage for the Adams Memorial Society, made up of the direct descendents of John and Abigail Adams, to manage the property. In 1946 the National Park Service accepted the Adams family estate from the Society, to continue the family mandate to inspire “civic virtue and patriotism.” “Peace field” resonates with the meanings that four Adams family generations invested in this place. "Posterity! you will never know how much it has cost my generation to preserve your freedom," wrote John Quincy Adams. "I hope you will make good use of it." A visit to Adams National Historical Park—to the Presidential Birthplaces, “Old House” at “Peace field,” Stone Library, Carriage House, and the outstanding museum collections— enables you to walk in the footsteps of one of the America’s great founding families.

↑ back to top

IMAGE and TEXT: Planning your day

DESCRIBING: Colored image of a green trolly.

SYNOPSIS: The trolly has yellow framed windows and doors with a white roof. One set of bus-like doors sit behind the two front windows, the second set of doors is placed before the fifth blackened window, The front two windows are translucent and the five in the back are black. Writing is on the side of the bus says, “Adams National Historical Park”, with a logo on the front and back.

CREDIT:  NPS / Adams National Historical Park Collection


RELATED TEXT:

The historic homes are open for guided tours from mid-Spring to mid-Autumn. An admission fee is charged for visitors age 15 and older. All tours begin at the visitor center in The Galleria at President’s Place, 1250 Hancock Street, Quincy, MA. The visitor center is open from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. The historic homes are closed during the winter and the visitor center operates on reduced hours. Advance reservations are required for groups of ten or more. Please call the visitor center at 617-770-1175 or go to www.nps.gov/adam to confirm open dates or make a group reservation.

Two-hour guided tours of the birthplaces and Old House at Peace field leave the visitor center every hour from 9:15 a.m. until 3:15 p.m. during the open season.

For directions by car: Visit the park website.
By rail: Take the Red Line Subway (Braintree Line) to the Quincy Center Station. At the top of the stairs turn left and leave by the Hancock Street exit. The visitor center is across Hancock Street in The Galleria at Presidents Place.

The United First Parish Church, final resting place of both presidents and first ladies, is next to the visitor center. If you choose to visit the church please allow 30 more minutes. An admission fee is charged. Across the street is the historic Hancock Cemetery, which is available for self-guiding tours.

↑ back to top

TEXT: Get oriented

Exhibits, a bookstore, orientation to the site, and public restrooms are available at the visitor center. Validated parking is offered in the Presidents Place Parking Garage, reached via Saville Avenue. For validation you must bring your ticket in to the visitor center. For lodging information visit the park website.

↑ back to top

TEXT: Passes

The park accepts National Parks and Federal Recreational Lands Pass, the annual pass for US military, and the Adams National Historical Park pass. Buy National Park Passes at the visitor center. They admit the cardholder and three other persons to the park.


↑ back to top

TEXT: Pets

Pets are not allowed in the park.

↑ back to top

TEXT: Junior Ranger

Do you have what it takes to help America to preserve and understand the importance of its national treasures? Pick up your Junior Ranger activity booklet at the visitor center. Complete it during your tour and bring it back to the visitor center to receive your badge and certificate commissioning you as a Junior Park Ranger.


↑ back to top

TEXT: How you can help

The park collections include over 75,000 artifacts belonging to four generations of the Adams family. To protect them, the following are prohibited in the homes:

Video or photography.

Backpacks, large bags, carriages, or strollers.

Touching furniture, wall coverings, or any artifacts.

Food, drink, smoking, and pets (except for service animals).


↑ back to top

TEXT: Firearms

For firearms regulations check the park website.

↑ back to top

TEXT: Donations

Donations are accepted at the visitor center and other locations.


↑ back to top

IMAGE and TEXT: "I want a garden and a park" quote

DESCRIBING: Black and white drawing that is slightly transparent, placed behind the text and map at the bottom of the page. 

SYNOPSIS: The drawing is a horizontal landscape of the road in front of The Old House at Peace field and surrounding buildings. Multiple buildings line the image with fences in the front and trees in the distance. Stone walkways are placed in front of buildings. 

CREDIT:  NPS / Adams National Historical Park Collection


QUOTE:

"I want a garden and a park. My Dwelling to surround." – John Quincy Adams

↑ back to top

MAP: Adams National Historical Park Visitors Center

DESCRIBING: Rectangular colored map displaying Boston and the surrounding area.

SYNOPSIS: Rectangular colored map displaying Boston and the surrounding area with Adams National Historical Park Visitor Center slight to the right of the center. A north arrow is placed towards the top left of the map with the arrow angled to the top of the map. At the bottom of the map is a distance scale depicting five Kilometers and five Miles. The map includes Boston in the North, Quincy in the center, and Braintree in the south. This map includes the major highways and MBTA Boat routes through Boston Harbor connecting Boston to Quincy and further southeast. Directly next to the visitor center is the Quincy Center Station, MBTA Red Line Subway stop. 

IN-DEPTH DESCRIPTION: Vehicle Transportation: Starting from the top of the map traveling South is Route 1, Interstate 93, and Route 1A. Off of 1A is Logan International Airport. Interstate 90 joins from the west and is a toll road. In the center of the map are Burgin Parkway and Route 3A which separate from the main highways to the southeast. Interstate 93 continues down the whole map until it separates at Exit 7, traveling west and continues as Interstate 93 until joining Interstate 95 that continues west and southwest towards Providence, Rhode Island. Between Exit 7 and the joining of Interstate 95, Route 24 separates heading directly south. Traveling east at Exit 7 becomes Route 3. Burgin Parkway joins Route 3 at Exit 19 and Exit 18, Washington Street, traveling to the southeast corner of the map towards Cape Cod, Massachusetts. 


↑ back to top

MAP and TEXT: Zoomed in map of Quincy

DESCRIBING: Large zoomed-in map of Quincy, Massachusetts.

IN-DEPTH DESCRIPTION: In the center-left of the map is a distance scale depicting 0.1 and 0.3 Kilometers, as well as 0.1 and 0.3 Miles. Below is a single keyed item of a solid yellow line that means the Recommended driving route to the NPS Visitor Center. Directly below is a North arrow that points to the top of the map. Various roads are spread out around the map. Different attractions are listed throughout the map, from North to South they include; The Quincy Homestead or Dorothy Quincy Hancock House, Old House at Peace field, Adams Academy, Visitor Center which has a Trolley Bus Tour inside the Galleria at President’s Place and a parking garage just northeast, Quincy Center Station, Thomas Crane Public Library, United First Parish Church, Hancock Cemetery, Birthplaces of John and John Quincy Adams, and the Abigail Adams Cairn. For the most part, the solid yellow line follows Burgin Parkway and the MBTA Red Line. The southwest corner of the map states the road leads to Route 3 and Interstate 93. The road that travels south leads to Route 3 and Braintree. 



RELATED TEXT: 

For directions by car see the park website.

By rail take the Red Line Subway (Braintree Line) to the Quincy Center Station. At the top of the stairs turn left and leave by the Hancock Street exit. The visitor center is across Hancock Street in The Galleria at Presidents Place.

↑ back to top

OVERVIEW: Accessibility

We strive to make our facilities, services, and programs accessible to all. For more information about our services, please ask a ranger, call, or check on our website.

↑ back to top

OVERVIEW: More information

Adams National Historical Park is one of over 400 parks in the National Park System. To learn more about parks and National Park Service programs in America’s communities please visit www.nps.gov.

ADDRESS: 135 Adams Street, Quincy, MA 02169-1749

PHONE: 617-770-1175

WEBSITE: www.nps.gov/adam

OTHER INFORMATION: National Park Foundation. Join the park community, www.nationalparks.org

↑ back to top