Blue Ridge Parkway

Audio Available:

OVERVIEW: About this Audio-Described Brochure

Welcome to the audio-described version of Blue Ridge Parkway's official print brochure. Through text and audio descriptions of photos and maps, this version interprets the two-sided color brochure that parkway visitors receive. 

The Blue Ridge Parkway stretches 469 miles through the states of Virginia and North Carolina. The brochure explores popular destinations along the length of the parkway and provides information for planning your visit. The front side of the brochure covers the Virginia section of the parkway, while the back covers the North Carolina section.

This audio version lasts about one hour and nine minutes, which we have divided into sections, as a way to improve the listening experience. 

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OVERVIEW: Blue Ridge Parkway

The Blue Ridge Parkway is more than just a road. Following the crest of the Blue Ridge Mountains for 469 miles through Virginia and North Carolina, the parkway invites travelers to enjoy the gentle beauty, and explore the rich history, of this storied region.   

Be sure to get out of your car while visiting the parkway. Hike to the crest of the mountains, where at times, you only need to reach up to touch a cloud. Enjoy the refreshing scent of Balsam fir forests carried on a cool breeze. Or marvel at the melodic, tumbling notes of a Winter Wren – a tiny bird with a great big song. 

Not in the mood for a hike? Sit a spell, and tap your toes to lively, old-time tunes. Or listen to the splash of water rushing along a flume and spilling over the wooden water wheel of an old mill as a miller grinds corn into meal. 

For those seeking to learn more about the park during their visit, stop by one of the parkway's 14 visitor centers. To find out more about what resources might be available or to contact the park directly, listen to the "Accessibility" and "More Information" sections at the end of this audio-described brochure.

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OVERVIEW: Front Side of Brochure

The front side of the brochure provides information about the Virginia section of the parkway and is comprosed of text, a map, and 13 color photographs. On the left half of the page, text and photographs highlight popular parkway destinations in Virginia. The map covers the entire right half of the page.


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IMAGES and TEXT: Blue Ridge Parkway, VIRGINIA

IMAGE 1 of 3: Sunset

DESCRIPTION: 

A collage with a main image of hazy, summer mountains, with a lush, green, leafy forest covering the mountains like a rumpled blanket. The mountains stretch to the horizon, and the green of the forest on the nearest ridges turns to soft blues on the furthest mountains. The sunset sky is hazy red-orange and the sun's setting rays sneak through holes in a wispy glowing cloud low on the horizon.  A quote overlays the bottom of the collage with the title Virginia just below. 
The quote by Stanley Abbott, chief parkway designer, reads: "A parkway like Blue Ridge has but one reason for existence, which is to please by revealing the charm and interest of the native American countryside." 

PHOTO CREDIT:

Jim Ruff


IMAGE 2 of 3: Mile Post sign

DESCRIPTION:

An inset photo of the Parkway’s milepost marker 0 is on the lower left side of the collage. It is a gray cement post with a blue painted numeral zero on it near the top. The post stands in short grass and has greenish algae growing on its weathered surface. 


PHOTO CREDIT:

NPS / Peter Hamel

 

IMAGE 3 of 3: Cabin

DESCRIPTION:

An inset photo of a log cabin on a sunny afternoon rests on the lower right side of the collage. The weathered, single-story cabin has an inviting front porch that runs the entire length of the house. The roof is covered with split oak shingles and a tall fieldstone chimney reaches to just above the roofline on the right side of the home. The front door is wide open. A wooden rocking chair sits on the shaded front porch to the right of the doorway. Four grapevine wreaths hang on the rafter ends to decorate the porch. Stone steps lead down from the porch to the dirt ground in front of the cabin.

CAPTION:

Cabin at Humpback Rocks

PHOTO CREDIT:

David Freuthal 


RELATED TEXT: 

The Blue Ridge Parkway was decades in the making by many people. Its route, stopping points, and vistas were all carefully planned. Stanley Abbott, the chief parkway designer and first superintendent, often talked with area residents and ensured their stories became part of the parkway.

As you travel this historic road through Virginia and North Carolina, enjoy its careful design revealing the region’s people, landscapes, and vistas. Stop often at historic sites, view exhibits, and walk trails. Look for roadside mile posts to mark your progress.

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TEXT: Humpback Rocks, Mile Post 6

At the Humpback Rocks Visitor Center and Mountain Farm, you can compare life today with long ago. This landscape shows life in the 1890s, a life without electricity, indoor plumbing, or modern technology. See the ingenious ways families found to meet their needs. Enjoy the popular trails nearby, including a hike up to Humpback Rocks or along the Appalachian National Scenic Trail.

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IMAGE and TEXT: James River, Mile Post 63

DESCRIPTION:

Photo of a replica batteau boat floating on the James River. The batteau is a 50-55 foot long, flat-bottomed, wooden riverboat used to haul cargo on rivers during America's Colonial period. The unpainted boat has a long oar on its pointed stern. Large, rectangular, wooden, cargo boxes line the center of the boat. The boat captain is wearing a loose cotton shirt, shorts, and a wide-brimmed straw hat for protection against the bright sun. He stands on the gunwale of the boat talking with a visitor, who is seated on a cargo box in the center of the boat. The image background shows gentle waves on the river on a breezy, sunny afternoon. 


CAPTION: 

Re-enactors in a batteau on the James River

CREDIT:

NPS / Peter Hamel.


RELATED TEXT:

Sometimes called “the river where America began,” the scenic James was vital to the settlement of Virginia. Stop by to learn about the old canal system and look for wildlife.

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IMAGES and TEXT: Peaks of Otter, Mile Post 86

 IMAGE 1 of 2: Peaks of Otter area

DESCRIPTION:

Color photo of a summer sunset taken from the bare and rocky summit of Sharp Top Mountain. Below, green forested mountains and valleys stretch to the horizon, turning to blue in the distance. The sun has just dipped below the horizon in a pool of yellow, and the sky is beginning to fade to violet and dusky blue. Wispy clouds dot the sky.  On the summit of Sharp Top Mountain, rounded and jumbled boulders perch 1,300 feet above the valley below, where the calm waters of Abbott Lake and the Peaks of Otter Lodge sit. The dense forest of the surrounding mountainsides gives way to two small green meadows on the far side of the lake. 

CAPTION:

Peaks of Otter area from Sharp Top.

CREDIT:

Jeff Mayfield.


IMAGE 2 of 2: View of Sharp Top

DESCRIPTION:

Photo of two motorcyclists riding single file along the parkway toward the camera. The motorcyclists wear helmets and ride touring bikes packed full of gear. Behind them, beyond the opposite side of the road, the forested slopes of Sharp Top Mountain rise from a valley into a hazy blue summer sky. Behind the motorcyclists, the parkway road winds to the left around a corner. A wooden guardrail and scattered trees line the far side of the road.


CAPTION:

Motorcyclists pass a view of Sharp Top.

CREDIT:

Peter Hamel.


RELATED TEXT:

For 8,000 years or more, people have been drawn to the Peaks of Otter and this valley. What have American Indian, English, German, Irish, African, and many other cultures found so valuable that they return generation after generation? Find out for yourself by exploring the area. Take a short walk to the 1930s Johnson farm or visit Polly Wood’s  Ordinary, an inn from the 1800s. Hike up Sharp Top Mountain. And go to the visitor center where exhibits show the area’s cultures, plants, and animals.

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TEXT: Roanoke, Mile Post 100 - 130

Stop by Explore Park to see a three-dimensional map of the entire parkway. Take a break in the shady picnic area at Roanoke Mountain.

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IMAGE and TEXT: Rocky Knob, Mile Post 167

DESCRIPTION:

Color photograph of two people, hiking in single file up a gentle grade on a wide dirt path nestled between a rushing creek and lush green forest. The forest is comprised of small diameter trees entangled with vines, and covered with leaves of many different shades of green. The forest floor is also covered in lush green plants so that much of the image is composed of varying shades of green. The stream flows past the hikers on the right and is dotted with rocks and boulders that create patches of white bubbles in the clear flowing water. The hikers are walking away from the camera and wear dark shorts and boots, dark backpacks, and light hats. They are carrying hiking sticks and backpacks.

CAPTION:

Rock Castle Gorge Trail.

CREDIT:

Alltrails.com


RELATED TEXT:

Hike into Rock Castle Gorge, one of the largest natural areas on the parkway. Stay a few days in the campground as you explore other nearby parkway areas.


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IMAGE and TEXT: bry Mill, Mile Post 176

DESCRIPTION:

Photo of a weathered, wooden mill standing on the far side of a tranquil pond. A dark brown, wooden water wheel powers the mill. The vantage point of the photo is from the edge of a mill pond looking across the pond at the mill, water wheel, and a portion of the wooden flume carries water to turn the wheel. The surface of the pond is still and provides a nearly perfect reflection of the mill, wheel, and banks surrounding the mill. In the forest behind the mill, one large tree is bright orange in peak autumn color. Many leaves have fallen and are floating on the still surface of the pond water. The grass surrounding the mill is brown and dormant.

CAPTION:

Mabry Mill

CREDIT:

Gary Boyd Photography

RELATED TEXT:

Ed and Lizzy Mabry built the mill in 1908 and operated it for 30 years. The wheel still grinds corn. Listen to the ring of a blacksmith’s hammer or watch as a weaver turns yarn into cloth. Enjoy a traditional Southern meal. On Sundays, people put on their dancing shoes when musicians fill the air with Appalahchin tunes.


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TEXT: Puckett Cabin, Mile Post 190

Visit the home of legendary midwife Orlean Puckett. She successfully delivered over 1,000 babies but lost her own 24 children in infancy.

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IMAGES and TEXT: Blue Ridge Music Center, Mile Post 213

IMAGE 1 of 4: Musicians

DESCRIPTION:

The photo is situated on the left side of the brochure and is half the width of the left side of the brochure. The edges of the photo are faded. The color photo is taken of older, white musicians sitting together on folding chairs with their stringed instruments in hand. In the black-and-white background is a small audience behind the musicians also sitting on folding chairs. Three clearly visible musicians with a fourth half-visible off the right edge of the photo are in the foreground. The musician on the left is a man holding and ready to play a violin, commonly referred to as a fiddle in mountain music. The next musician is a man picking on a banjo. These two musicians are gazing downward at each other’s instruments. The next musician to the right is a woman focused on playing a fiddle. The next musician is a man strumming his guitar which is partially seen on the right side of the photo.

CREDIT:

Richard Emmett


IMAGE 2 of 4: Roots of American Music

DESCRIPTION:

The photo is situated on the right half of the left side of the brochure and shares space with an image of a fiddle and banjo. The setting is in a museum with carpeted floors, no visible ceiling, and various styles of lighting throughout. The photo is of a “Roots of American Music” display. The display is a curved wall surface and starts on the left of the photo then wraps around to disappear on the right side of the photo. A man is standing on the right side of the photo looking to the left of the photo and directly at the display. The display stands about two feet above the man. The display has writing on it with a well-lit glass case in the center but the contents are not fully visible.

CREDIT:

Lowes Travel / MLowe


IMAGE 3 and 4: Fiddle and Banjo

DESCRIPTION:

An image of a fiddle and banjo are situated on the right half of the left side of the brochure and shares space with the photo of a “Roots of American Music” display. The image is of the instruments positioned side by side to show the size comparison. The fiddle is about three quarters the length of the banjo.

CREDIT:

NPS

Banjo built by Jay Moschella 
Photo by Lindsay Metivier

RELATED TEXT:

The parkway’s celebration of music straddles state lines and generations here. During the center’s season, musicians play traditional tunes every day on the porch. People flock to outdoor concerts. In the exhibit hall, enjoy videos and recordings of people singing songs of their ancestors. Discover musical links between Europe, Africa, and America and see how instruments have changed. Walk the grounds and listen for birds, insects, and a creek  — natural music you can hear all along the parkway.

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IMAGES: Blue Ridge Parkway Scene and Bluebird

IMAGE 1 of 2: Parkway Scene

DESCRIPTION:

Semi transparent, faded background photo of a sharp left curve in the Parkway motor road and the adjoining grassy pasture, separated by a weathered, wooden fence. The pavement edge is lined with neatly mowed grass. Approximately 20 feet from the road edge, an unpainted, post and rail fence parallels the roadway and separates the green mowed roadside grass from the tall golden grasses in the adjacent pasture. At the far edge of the pasture, leafy forest trees line the summertime horizon.


CAPTION:

Parkway Scene

CREDIT:

NPS


IMAGE 2 of 2: Eastern Bluebird

DESCRIPTION:

Small, silhouetted image of an Eastern Bluebird perched on a branch. The bird has a white belly, amber colored breast, and blue head. The bird's body is positioned nearly straight on in the photo, but it's head is turned to the left. The bluebird is tucked in the lower right corner of the background image of the road, as if perched on a fence post watching the road. 

CAPTION:

Eastern Bluebird

CREDIT:

Hammerchewer

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TEXT: Safe Travel Along the Parkway

You can find details about park travel and regulations at www.nps.gov/blri and in free publications available at visitor centers.

Road and facility closures at go.nps.gov/brp-map

Cell service, GPS Unreliable.

Emergencies call 911

More Information
Blue Ridge Parkway
199 Hemphill Knob Road
Asheville NC 28803

Follow us on social media.

Blue Ridge Parkway is one of over 400 parks in the National Park System. Learn more about national parks at www.nps.gov

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TEXT: A Few Travel Tips

Driving times on the parkway are often longer than expected.

• Fuel available only in nearby towns.

• Expect ice, snow, and closed roads in winter.

• Watch for vehicles entering from overlooks and side roads.

• Many tunnels have low clearance; check heights before you travel.

• Share the road with bicyclists.

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TEXT: Basic Regulations

Park only in designated areas.

• Keep pets on leashes.

• Fires, including charcoal, allowed only in campgrounds and picnic areas.

• No hunting.

• No swimming.

• Boating allowed only in a few places.

• Remotely operated aircraft, including drones, not allowed.

• OK to gather fruits, nuts, and berries for your own consumption.

• Federal law protects all natural, historical, and archeological objects.

• Firearms regulations on park website.

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MAP: Northern End of the Blue Ridge Parkway (Virginia)

The parkway covers 217 miles in the state of Virginia, from Shenandoah National Park in a southwesterly direction to the North Carolina State Line.

There are points of interest, camping, limited food service and restrooms along this stretch of road.

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Map Legend and Symbols

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TEXT: Virginia by Mile Post North to South

Milepost is abbreviated as MP in the following text.

MP 0, Rockfish Gap, US250-  this marks the end of Shenandoah National Park and Skyline Drive and the beginning of the Blue Ridge Parkway. Access on and off the parkway is available, access to Interstate 64 is available via US250, access to Waynesboro, VA 4 miles via Interstate 64, access to Charlottesville, VA is 22 miles  via Interstate 64

MP 5.8 Humpback Rocks Visitor Center and Mountain Farm Museum, parking area on West side, Visitor Information and restrooms available seasonally

MP 6 Humpback Gap Parking Area, access on East side, access to the Appalachian National Scenic Trail (AT)

MP 8.4 Humpback Rocks Picnic Area on East side of the parkway. Restrooms available seasonally

MP 10.7 Ravens Roost Overlook, on West side 

MP 13.1 Parkway passes through Reids Gap, at grade crossing with Virginia State Route 664, Three Ridges Parking Area is just off parkway on East side with access to Appalachian National Scenic Trail (AT)

MP 16  Virginia SR 814 on West side

MP 22.2 Bald Mountain Overlook, elevation 3,587 ft on West side

MP 27.2 Parkway passes through Tye River Gap, Virginia SR 56, access on and off the parkway 

MP 29.1 Whetstone Ridge on West Side, Restrooms are available year round

MP 34.4 Yankee Horse Ridge Parking Area, East side access old logging railroad interpretive, access Wigwam Falls 

MP 37.4 Irish Gap, Elevation 2200 ft 

MP 42.2 Irish Creek Valley Overlook West side, Elevation 2665 ft

MP 44.9 Chimney Rock Mountain Overlook, on West side

MP 45.6 US Highway 60, access on West side,  to Buena Vista Virginia 5 miles via US60 West, to Amherst Virginia 22 miles via US60 East

MP 46.9 Indian Gap Parking Area, East side

MP 51.7 Punch Bowl Parking Area, East side, access to Appalachian National Scenic Trail

MP 53.1 Bluff Mountain Tunnel, the only tunnel on the parkway in Virginia

MP 56.6 to MP 62.1, Parkway crosses over Otter Creek nine times

M 60.8 Otter Creek Campground, access on East side

MP 61.6 Virginia SR 130, to Glasgow Virginia 8 miles West, to Elon Virginia 11 miles via SR130 East

MP 62.9 Otter Lake on East side of parkway

MP 63.5 James River Visitor Center, Restrooms, Picnic Area, and remnants of historic canal locks. Parking area on east side of parkway.  Facilities open seasonally. 

MP 63.7 Parkway crosses over James River, lowest point on the Blue Ridge Parkway, elevation 649 ft

MP 63.8 US 501, access to Glasgow, VA 9 miles 501 West, to Lynchburg, VA 21 via 501 East

MP 71 Petite's Gap, Elevation 2361ft

MP 74.7 Thunder Ridge Overlook, West side 

MP 74.9 Appalachian National Scenic Trail crosses the parkway, a worn narrow path on each side of parkway is only visible evidence of crossing, no parking area is available to access the trail

MP 76.7 Highest point on the Blue Ridge Parkway in Virginia at 3950 ft

MP 78.4 Sunset Field Overlook, West side, access to Apple Orchard Falls Trail and AT as it crosses Apple Orchard Falls Trail.  US Forest Service Road access.

MP 83.1 Falling Cascades Parking Area, access to Falling Water Cascades Trail on West side

MP 83.5 Flat Top Mountain Trail Parking Area, East Side
Entering Peaks of Otter 

MP 85.6 Peaks of Otter Lodge, access on East side, Restaurant, Restrooms, Coffee Shop, Gift Shop, Bus stop for concession bus up Sharp Top Mountain, Campground, Picnic Area, Trailheads, Abbott Lake, Polly Woods' Ordinary cultural historic site. Open seasonally.
View of Sharp Top Mountain to East,  peak elevation 3875ft

MP 91 Bearwallow Gap, elevation 2258ft

MP 92.5 Sharp Top Parking Area, East side, access to Appalachian Trail

MP 95.3 Harveys Knob Overlook on West side, AT access, Picnic Area

MP 99.6 Great Valley Overlook on West side,  elevation 2,943 ft

MP 105.8 US 460/221, access on and off the parkway is available

MP 110.6 Stewarts Knob Overlook, on East side

MP 112.2 Virginia State Highway 24, access on and off the parkway is available

MP 114.8 Bridge over Roanoke River

MP 114.9 Roanoke River Overlook, West side, elevation 985 feet

MP 115.2 Explore Park Spur Road, access to Virginia’s Explore Park Visitor Center, Restrooms. Open year-round.

MP 120.4, Mill Mountain Spur Road, to Roanoke Mountain Picnic Area

MP 121.4 US 220, access on and off the parkway is available

MP 129.6 Roanoke Valley Overlook, on West side 

MP 135.9  US 221 access

MP 136.0 Adney Gap, elevation 2,670 ft

MP 143.9 Devils Backbone Overlook, East side of parkway

MP 150.8 Virginia SR 681, West side of parkway, access to Floyd 10 miles South and Virginia SR 640 East 

MP 154.6 Smart View Picnic Area, East side, Restrooms available seasonally

MP 159.3 crossing with Virginia SR 860

MP 162.4 Rakes Mill Pond, West side

MP 165.3 Tuggle Gap, elevation 2752 ft

MP 165.3 Virginia SR 8, to Floyd Virginia 6 miles West, SR 58 East to Meadows of Dan

MP 167.1 Rocky Knob Campground, access is on West side 

MP 168.7 Rock Castle Gorge Overlook, access on East side

MP 169.0 Rocky Knob Picnic Area, access is on West side, Restrooms 

MP 173.9 SR 799, West side

MP 176.2 Mabry Mill, Store, and Restaurant, Wast side of parkway, Restrooms 

MP 177.7 US 58 Business, access on and off the parkway is available

MP 179.3 Round Meadow Overlook, West side

MP 188.8 Groundhog Mountain Picnic Area, access on East side, Restrooms 

MP 189.8 Puckett Cabin, parking area is on west side of parkway

MP 193.7 Virginia SR 691, East side of parkway

MP 199.4 Fancy Gap, elevation 2925 feet

MP 199.4 US 52, access on and off the parkway is available, Hillsville Virginia 8 miles on US 52 West, Mount Airy North Carolina 14 miles via US 52 East

MP 203.9 Piedmont Overlook on East side

MP 206.1 Pipers Gap, elevation  2,759 feet

MP 212.8 Blue Ridge Music Center, access is on the East side of parkway, Visitor Information, Museum, Restrooms open seasonally

MP 215.8 Virginia SR 89, to Galax Virginia 7 miles 89 West, Mount Airy North Carolina 22 miles via Virginia SR 89 East

MP 217.2 North Carolina SR 18, to Sparta North Carolina 15 miles via Route 18 West, to Mount Airy North Carolina is 22 via NC SR 18 East

MP 216.9 State Line of Virginia and North Carolina


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TEXT: Virginia Highlights

This text label covers the topics below: Major Points of Interest, Visitor Centers, Restrooms, Food on the Parkway, and Stores.
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TEXT: Major Points of Interest - VA

Major Points of Interest (Listed North to South)

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TEXT: Visitor Centers - VA

Visitor Centers

Open Seasonally- typically May through mid-October, but varies

MP 5.8,  Humpback Rocks
MP 63.6,  James River
MP 85.9,  Peaks of Otter
MP 169,  Rocky Knob
MP 213,  Blue Ridge Music Center

Open most weeks of the year but not 7 days/week
MP 115,  Explore Park

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TEXT: Restrooms - VA

Open year-round
MP 29,  Montebello District Ranger Office

Open Seasonally, typically May to October

MP 6,  Humpback Rocks Visitor Center
MP 8,  Humpback Rocks Picnic Area
MP 63,  James River Visitor Center
MP 86,  Peaks of Otter Visitor Center, Lodge, Picnic Area, Sharp Top Store

Open most of the year but not 7 days/week
MP 115,  Explore Park Visitor Center

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TEXT: Food on the Parkway - VA

Open Seasonally, typically May to October

MP 86  Peaks of Otter Lodge and Restaurant, Sharp Top Store

MP 176  Mabry Mill
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TEXT: Stores - VA

Gift Stores

MP 85.6  Peaks of Otter Country Store and Coffee Shop


MP 85.9 Sharp Top Camp Store

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Bodies of Water - VA

This text label covers the topics below: Lakes and Ponds; Rivers; and Waterfall Access.

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TEXT: Lakes and Ponds

MP 13 Sherando Lake, West Side
MP 60 Otter Lake, East Side
MP 75 Cave Mountain Lake, West Side
MP 86 Abbott Lake, West Side
MP 110 Smith Mountain Lake State Park , 32 miles via VA 24 East 
MP 162 Rakes Mill Pond

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TEXT: Rivers

MP 63  James River

MP 114  Roanoke River

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TEXT: Waterfall Access

MP 20 White Rock Falls
MP 22 St Marys Falls
MP 27 Crabtree Falls adjacent to parkway- Highway 56 East
MP 34  Wigwam Falls
MP 78 Apple Orchard Falls
MP 83  Fallingwater Cascades

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TEXT: Nearby Communities - VA

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TEXT: Nearby Public Lands - VA

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OVERVIEW: Back Side of Brochure

The back side of the brochure provides information about the North Carolina section of the parkway and is composed of text, a map, and 13 color photographs. The left half of the page includes text and photographs that highlight popular parkway destinations in North Carolina. The map covers the entire right half of the page.

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IMAGES and TEXT: Blue Ridge Parkway, NORTH CAROLINA

IMAGE: Highway scene

DESCRIPTION:

A level, two-lane road, divided by double yellow lines, curves off into a forest.  A short wooden fence, acting as a guard rail, parallels the road.  Beyond the road, trees taper down the side of the mountain. Past the trees, there is a gap with a distant mountain rising up, and behind that, another off in the distance with a wisp of fog in between the two.  The sky above the mountains is white. 

CREDIT:

Adrian Etheridge


IMAGE: Basket

DESCRIPTION:

Inset of a basket, hand-woven from vines, as an example of local folk art. With a wide handle rising from one side to the other it can be carried around with one hand.  Each strand of bark can be distinguished as they all come together to form the round shape.  

CREDIT:

Courtesy Case Antiques, Knoxville, TN


QUOTE:

"We’ve got views that roll away forever.  ... You can touch a cloud up here." – Longtime park ranger


RELATED TEXT:

Construction of the Blue Ridge Parkway began in 1935 at Cumberland Knob (milepost 218). Stop here to learn more about the parkway’s early history. Doughton Park features the Brinegar Cabin (mp 238), where you can imagine the challenges of living in the mountains a century ago. 

Like the Virginia portion, the parkway in North Carolina has many vistas, exhibits, and interesting places to stop. Some are described here; many more await you. Mile posts mark your progress as you drive this high elevation, scenic road that some call “America’s favorite drive.” 

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Cone Manor and Price Park, Mile Post 293 - 299 (Image and Text)

DESCRIPTION:  A photograph of a stately, wooden, two-story mansion. The white-painted house mixes features of Beaux Arts and Colonial Revival architectural styles that were popular in the late Victorian age. A wide, covered porch graces the front of the home and wraps around the sides, inviting visitors to relax in a cool shade. In the center of the facade, the porch projects out into a half-circle, drawing attention to the front entrance. Elegant, white ionic columns support the porch roof. The entire length of the porch to the left of the front door has been enclosed with tall windows to create a cheerful sunroom. To the left of the sunroom, the porch extends out into a porte-cochere. Stairs lead up from the lawn to the porch.

The second floor is surrounded by a balcony that follows the shape of the porch below it.  A low, white, ornamental railing with evenly spaced pickets encloses the balcony.

The slate gray roof is punctuated by two white chimneys and five dormers with windows. The center dormer is wide and triangular with a semi-circular window, while the dormers flanking it are short and narrow. A widow's walk crowns the top center of the roof like a tiara. 

A white fence with fat, rounded columns runs across the manicured, green lawn in front of the home. Behind the house, tall, leafy trees reach toward the blue sky overhead.

CAPTION: 

Flat Top Manor.

CREDIT:

NPS.

RELATED TEXT:

Moses Cone, who made a fortune from denim, built Flat Top Manor as a summer mountain escape. Nearby, Julian Price bought land to create a retreat for employees of his insurance company. Both parks continue to offer a variety of recreation, including fishing, boating, camping, and hiking.

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Linn Cove Viaduct, Mile Post 304

DESCRIPTION: 

The brilliant reds, oranges, and golds of autumn trees cloak a mountainside upon which a graceful ribbon of road forms a bridge that looks to be almost suspended in air. This is the Linn Cove Viaduct, an engineering wonder that was built from the top down to protect the fragile ecosystem of Grandfather Mountain. The lithe curves of the bridge sweep to the left, then to the right, before disappearing behind the mountain. Deep green pine trees punctuate the autumn forest surrounding the bridge. On the far horizon, hazy, blue mountains touch a pale, blue sky dotted with wispy clouds. 

CAPTION:

Linn Cove Viaduct

CREDIT:

Mark Clark

RELATED TEXT:

Looming above the viaduct, Grandfather Mountain is home to more rare plant and animal species than any mountain east of the Rockies. The viaduct was engineered to protect this beautiful, but fragile, area. Stop at the visitor center to learn how this engineering marvel was built.

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IMAGE: Eastern Red-Spotted Newt

DESCRIPTION:  

A red-spotted newt, a type of salamander. This juvenile newt is a bright, reddish orange in color that warns predators, "you'll be sorry if you eat me!"  A row of widely spaced black spots line each side of its back. The skin on its back is rough and slightly pebbly.  His tail is as long as his body and curls like shepherd's crook at the tip. 

CAPTION:

Eastern Red-Spotted Newt

CREDIT:

Mark VanDyke

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IMAGE and TEXT: Linville Falls, Mile Post 316

DESCRIPTION:

A faded picture of a river and waterfall landscape. Large granite rocks on either side of the photo, generally flat on top, hold in gray water.  In the top right of the shot is a small waterfall, cascading straight down through granite and falling behind a large rock that is in the field of view where the falling water hits the river. In the background, the granite holds in the river water, the steep sides are strewn with long straight tree trunks that have fallen over and are dotted with green mosses and shrubs.  

CAPTION:

Linville Falls area

CREDIT:

Mark Steven Houser

RELATED TEXT:

Walk a short trail to several views of the Linville River cascading into deep, wild Linville Gorge. The gorge was one of the first wilderness areas designated by Congress. Exhibits explain the complex geology that formed this area. Longer, more rugged trails lead to primitive campsites in the wilderness beyond parkway boundaries.

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IMAGE and TEXT: Museum of North Carolina Minerals, Mile Post 331

DESCRIPTION:

A prospecting pick is shown. This hand tool consists of a wooden handle about a foot long.  On top of the handle sits a metal tool, flat on one end similar to a hammer and pointed on the other.  The head of the tool is half as long as the handle.  

CREDIT:

Henry Cheney Hammer Co., John Bodden, Jr

RELATED TEXT:

MP 331 Discover how minerals have shaped this nation, from America’s first gold rush to today’s computer industry.


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IMAGE and TEXT: Craggy Gardens, Mile Post 364

DESCRIPTION:

The soft light of a mid-summer morning forms a patchwork of light and shadow on the flanks of lushly-forested mountains. A riot of green in varying shades, from the dark needles of spruce trees to the bright yellow-green of young birch leaves covers the mountainsides. The bright pink flowers of Catawba rhododendron shrubs frame the lower edge of the photo. Thick, white clouds cling to the highest mountain peaks in the center of the photo. While far on the horizon at the right of the image, distance fades the greens of the forest into the classic blues that give the Blue Ridge Mountains their name. 

CAPTION:

Catawba rhododendron at Craggy Gardens

CREDIT:

Johan Hakansson

RELATED TEXT:

Nature’s garden flourishes on these high slopes. Rhododendrons blanket the mountains in pink in early summer. Wildflowers bloom along hiking trails.

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MP 370 – 395 Asheville area

Stop at the Folk Art Center ( MP 382) to see traditional and contemporary crafts. At the Blue Ridge Parkway Visitor Center (MP 384), view a film and exhibits about the parkway’s history and heritage.

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IMAGE and TEXT: Pisgah Area, Mile Post 407 - 430

DESCRIPTION:

A color photo of the jagged, rocky outcrop of Devils Courthouse, a high-elevation mountain that rises above the surrounding forest of tall, dark-green spruce trees. The rock outcrop at the summit is bare stone, varying in shade from light to dark gray. Near the center of the photo, the summit is gently rounded, but the front and nearest side of the outcrop fall steeply into the thick forest below. The forest grows up the backside of the knob, right up to the outcrop. A pale blue sky is partially obscured by light gray clouds.

CAPTION:

Devils Courthouse

CREDIT:

David Smart

RELATED TEXT:

Take your time exploring this high elevation country. Enjoy its many views and trails, and look for wildlife. During spring and fall, you might see birds of prey and monarch butterflies migrating along the ridges.

Pull over at Devils Courthouse (mp 422), a rugged, exposed mountain rich in Cherokee history.  Hike the steep, paved trail to the top.  You will be rewarded with spectacular, 360 degree views.

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TEXT: Waterrock Knob, Mile Post 451

TEXT: What does bear fur feel like? How big are elk antlers? Find out at the parkway’s highest visitor center. From here the road descends through Qualla Boundary, home of the Eastern Cherokee, to Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

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IMAGE: Monarch Butterfly

DESCRIPTION:

A color photograph of a monarch butterfly with its wings open. The butterfly's wings are orange with black veining. A narrow border of black with small white spots edges the wings.

CAPTION:

Monarch Butterfly

CREDIT:

Peter Miller


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IMAGE: One of the Parkway’s 26 Tunnels

DESCRIPTION:

A gray, stone archway frames a tunnel that straddles the parkway road. At the far end, beams of yellow sunlight brightly illuminate the tunnel, reaching almost the middle of the tunnel where it curves to the left. On the near side, the tunnel is dark inside. Surrounding the tunnel, trees and shrubs are beginning to display the early yellow shades of autumn in their leaves. In the foreground, on the right-hand side of the road, brown sign with white lettering reads, "Ferrin Knob Tunnel No. 3"

CAPTION:
One of the parkway’s 26 tunnels

CREDIT:
Steve Freedman Photography

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TEXT: Services, Facilities, Activities Along the Parkway

You can find details about park travel and regulations at www.nps.gov/blri and in free publications available at visitor centers.

Driving tips and basic regulations listed on other side.

Road and facility closures go.nps.gov/brp-map

Cell service, GPS Unreliable

Emergencies call 911

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TEXT: Getting Around


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TEXT: Food

Full-service dining at Peaks of Otter Lodge, Mabry Mill, and Pisgah Inn. Lighter fare at  other areas as shown on maps.

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TEXT: Lodging

Peaks of Otter Lodge and Pisgah Inn seasons and dates vary. Reservations  recommended.

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Campgrounds

Open summer through fall, reservations recommended through recreation.gov.

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TEXT: Picnic Areas

Picnic areas have tables, grills. Drinking water, restrooms available seasonally. Some overlooks also have picnic tables.

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TEXT: Walking and Hiking

Many overlooks have short trails; major areas have longer trails.

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TEXT: Just for Kids

Ask about the Track Trails program and how to become a Junior Ranger.


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TEXT: Ranger-Led Programs

Held throughout the park, mostly in summer.  Schedules posted on bulletin boards and at visitor centers. 
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OVERVIEW: Accessibility

We strive to make facilities, services, and programs accessible to all.  Details at visitor centers, on park website, and in other guides.
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MAP: Southern end of the Blue Ridge Parkway - North Carolina

The parkway covers 249 miles in the state of North Carolina, from the Virginia state line in a southwesterly direction ending at Great Smoky Mountains National Park in Tennessee. 

There are points of interest, camping, limited food service and restrooms along this stretch of road. 


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Map Legend and Symbols

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MAP: North Carolina by Milepost North to South

On the map are large patches of light green, indicating National Forest land, dark green along the road corridor to signify land owned by the National Park Service, small irregular sections of dark brown where the land is managed as a State Park, a light yellow wherever there is a population center and light brown for everything else. The Blue Ridge Parkway runs the length of the map with its neon green line and other roads crisscrossing the area are a dark brown.

Welcome to North Carolina. The Blue Ridge Parkway continues for 252 miles southwest from the State Line to Great Smoky Mountains National Park. This section of the road passes through the Pisgah National Forest and the Nantahala National Forest. There are 25 tunnels in the North Carolina section as well.


In the following text, the word Milepost is abbreviated MP.

MP 217.5, Cumberland Knob Picnic Area, East side of parkway, restrooms available from May through October

MP 218.4, Fox Hunters Paradise Overlook, overlook on the East side of parkway

MP 229.5, U.S. Highway 21, access on and off the parkway is available, access to Sparta is 8 miles from the parkway via U.S. Highway 21 to the West and from there to West Jefferson is 30 miles, access to Roaring Gap via U.S. Highway 21 to the East

MP 230.1, Little Glade Mill Pond, pullout on East side of parkway

MP 237.1 Air Bellows Gap Overlook access to pullout on the West Side, elevation 3743 feet

Entering Doughton Park

MP 238.5 Historic Brinegar Cabin pullout on the East Side. Cabin may be open for viewing, typically in summer months. Area signage and Blue Ridge Parkway website will note open dates and times.

MP 239.3 Doughton Park Campground access on the West Side

MP 241 Doughton Park Visitor Center, restrooms and Gift Store with snacks, access on West Side. On East side access to the picnic area and trailheads.

MP 243.4 Bluffs Mountain View access on East side. Elevation 3334 feet

MP 244.8 Leaving Doughton Park

MP 248 Junction US 18 access to Laurel Springs 2 miles Northwest

MP 258.6 Junction North Carolina 1632 Trading Post Road access to Glendale Springs .5 miles to the East.

MP 258.8 On the West Side access to the Northwest Trading Post gift store with coffee and restrooms.

MP 260.2, Jumpinoff Rock Overlook on the East side of parkway, elevation 3,162 feet

MP 261.2, Junction North Carolina State Route 16, access on and off the parkway in both directions is available. West Jefferson via SR16 West is 13 miles

MP 264.4 On the East side is The Lump Overlook pullout and parking area with 0.2 mile trail to the top

MP 268 Benge Gap, elevation 3330 feet

MP 272 Jeffress Park access on the East side to Picnic Area and Restrooms

MP 273 East side access to Tompkins Knob Overlook and the historic Jesse Brown Cabin

MP 276.4 Deep Gap at elevation 3142 feet, Junction of US 421 South/221 North with access to Boone 12 miles

MP 285 Daniel Boone’s Trace Overlook access to pullout on East side

MP 292 Junction US 321 South 2 miles to Blowing Rock, further to Lenoir or Junction US 321 North 7 miles to Boone

MP 292.7 Entering Moses H Cone Memorial Park

MP 294 Entrance to Moses H Cone Manor House and grounds on the East side. Walking tours of the Home, carriage roads, restrooms and a local crafts store.

MP 296.5 Price Park Picnic Area, Restrooms and Trail access on West side

MP 296.8 Price Lake pullout parking and lake viewing area on East Side. Access to Price Lake Trail.

MP 297 Julian Price Memorial Park Campground access on West side

MP 298.6 Leave Julian Price Park

MP 299 Off to the Northwest side is a view of Grandfather Mountain at 5946 feet

MP 299.9 Access to Grandfather Mountain State Park on the West Side

MP 300 Pisgah National Forest borders the Parkway to the South and East for the next 55 miles, then to the North and West for 15 miles until the road drops down to Asheville, North Carolina

MP 303 Entering Linn Cove Viaduct

MP 304.4 Linn Cove Visitor Center access on the East Side. Visitor Center, Restrooms and a short trail to view the Linn Cove Viaduct from underneath

MP 305 Junction US 221 access on West side, take US 221 South 3 miles to Linville or US221 North 15 miles to Blowing Rock

MP 305.2 Beacon Heights Overlook pullout on East side. Elevation 4220 feet


MP 308.3 Flat Rock pullout on West Side

MP 316.3 Spur road to Linville Falls area on East Side. Access to Linville River, hiking trails, Visitor Center, Restrooms and Linville Falls Campground

MP 316.5 Linville Falls Picnic Area access on West Side

MP 317.5 Junction US 221 access on West side to Spruce Pine 13 miles

MP 320.8 Chestoa View Overlook on East side. Elevation 4090 feet

MP 323 Bear Den Overlook on East side. Elevation 3359 feet

MP 331 Museum of North Carolina Minerals access on West side, Visitor Center, Museum Exhibits, Gift Store and Restrooms.
Elevation here at Gillespie Gap, 2819 feet
Access to the Overmountain Victory National Historic Trail: American Revolution
patriots crossed the mountains in 17 80 to defeat British loyalists at Kings Mountain,
South Carolina

MP 333.7 Little Switzerland town access on East side

MP 339.5 Crabtree Falls Campground access on West Side. Also parking for Crabtree Falls Trail.

MP 340.4 Crabtree Falls Picnic Area access on East side

MP 344 Buck Creek Gap pullout on East side. Elevation 3373 feet.

MP 344.2 State Route 80 to Marion 16 miles, access on East side.

MP 350.4 Green Knob Overlook pullout on East side. Elevation 4760

MP 355.4 Access road to Mount Mitchell State Park Visitor Center, Restrooms, and restaurant
Mount Mitchell at 6684 feet is the highest point east of the Mississippi River

MP 361 Glassmine Falls Overlook on the East side

MP 363.4 Graybeard Mountain overlook on East Side. Elevation 5592 feet.


MP 364.1 Craggy Dome pullout on West side.

MP 364.6 Craggy Gardens Visitor Center on West Side, Restrooms and Gift Store

MP 364.8 Access to Craggy Gardens Picnic Area on West Side.

MP 375.7 Junction Ox Creek Road to Weaverville and to Z B Vance Birthplace

MP 377.4 Craven Gap

Junction State Route 694/ Town Mountain Road to Asheville

MP 382.1 Folk Art Center, Crafts Store, Demonstrations and Restrooms on West Side. Open year-round, hours vary.

MP 382.6 Junction State Route 70 East to Black Mountain 9 miles, or West to Asheville

MP 383 Bridge over the Swanannoa River

MP 384.1 Blue Ridge Parkway Visitor Center, Restrooms, and Gift Store. A separate building is Park Headquarters. Access to both on West side.
Open  Year-Round

MP 384.7 Junction US 74 West to Asheville or Interstate 240 and Interstate 40 or East to Bat Cave, North Carolina and further to Chimney Rock State Park 18 miles;

MP 388.9 Junction US 25 Sweeten Creek Road to Arden. 

MP 389 The Biltmore Estate is West of Highway 25 and South of Highway 40 in South Asheville.

MP 391 The Blue Ridge Parkway crosses over Interstate 26

MP 393 Bridge over the French Broad River

MP 393.6 Junction State Route 191 north to Asheville 9 miles or south to Hendersonville and the Carl Sandburg National Historic Site 18 miles. All services can be found in both towns.
Also access to Lake Powhatan campground, a unit of the US Forest Service and
The North Carolina Arboretum

MP 395 The Blue Ridge Parkway is now bordered on both sides by the lush green of the Pisgah National Forest until the Waterrock Knob Visitor Center at mile post 451.

MP 407 On the West side is the trailhead parking for Mt Pisgah, followed by the Picnic Area and then the Mount Pisgah Campground. On the East Side, after the campground is the access to the Mount Pisgah Inn, camp store and restaurant.

MP 410 Cold Mountain can be viewed to the Northwest. Elevation 6030 feet

MP 411.8 Junction of US 276 on the East side. Access to Waynesville via US 276 North 20 miles or to the US 276 South to the Cradle of Forestry Visitor Center (US Forest Service),

15 miles as well as Sliding Rock, the Pisgah Center for Wildlife Education, Pisgah National Forest trails and DuPont State Recreational Forest.

MP 415.7 Cherry Cove Overlook, pullout on West side

MP 417 Looking Glass Rock Overlook on the East side. Elevation 4493 feet.

MP 418.8 Access to Graveyard Fields parking, seasonal Restrooms and trailheads on West side. Elevation 5120 feet.


MP 420.2 Black Balsam Road on West side. Forest Service Road access to Shining Rock Wilderness, Art Loeb Trail and Black Balsam Trailhead.

MP 422.4 Devil’s Courthouse Overlook and trailhead on East side

MP 423.2 Junction State Route 215, North to Waynesville 23 miles, South to Rosman 17 miles

MP 431.4 Richland Balsam, the highest point on the Parkway at 6035 feet

MP 443 Balsam Gap. Elevation 3370 feet. Also Junction US 23 North/ US 74 East toWaynesville 8 miles or US 23 South/ US 74 West 12 miles to Sylva.

MP 451.2 Access to Waterrock Knob Visitor Center, Restrooms and trails on North West side

MP 455.5 Soco Gap Overlook on South East side. Elevation 4340 feet.

MP 455.7 Junction with US 19, North 4 miles to Maggie Valley or US 19 South 12 miles to Cherokee

MP 456 Entering Cherokee Indian Reservation
Note: There is one tunnel in this section with 10 foot, 6 inch clearance

MP 469 Southern End of the Blue Ridge Parkway
Entering Great Smoky Mountains National Park

MP 469 Oconaluftee Visitor Center on West Side, information, Restrooms, trailheads and maps for Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Open all year.


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North Carolina Highlights

This text label covers the topics below: Major Points of Interest, Visitor Centers, Restrooms, Food on the Parkway, and Stores.

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TEXT: Major Points of Interest - NC

Major Points of Interest (listed North to South)



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TEXT: Visitor Centers - NC


Open Year Round

MP 331,  Museum of North Carolina Minerals   

MP 384,  Blue Ridge Parkway Visitor Center

Open Seasonally- typically May through mid-October but varies

MP 241, Doughton Park

MP 304.4, Linn Cove

MP 316.3,  Linville Falls Visitor Center

MP 364.6,  Craggy Gardens

MP 451,  Waterrock Knob

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TEXT: Restrooms - NC

Year Round
MP 331,  Museum of North Carolina Minerals
MP 382.1,  Folk Art Center
MP 384.1,  Asheville Visitor Center
Open Seasonally- typically May through mid-October but varies
MP 241,  Doughton Park
MP 258.8,  Northwest Trading Post
MP 272,  Jeffress Park Picnic Area
MP 294,  Moses Cone Estate
MP 296.5,  Price Park Lake Picnic Area
MP 304.4,  Linn Cove Visitor Center
MP 316.3,  Linville Falls Visitor Center
MP 364.6,  Craggy Gardens Visitor Center
MP 407,  Mt Pisgah Inn and Picnic Area
MP 451,  Waterrock Knob


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TEXT: Food on the Parkway - NC

Restaurants on the Parkway

Mount Mitchell State Park - MP 355.4 (restaurant is 3 miles off the Parkway)
Mount Pisgah Inn - MP 407

Snack Stores
Doughton Park - MP 241
Northwest Trading Post - MP 258.8
Mount Pisgah Camp Store - MP 407



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TEXT: Stores - NC

This text label covers the topics below: Gift Stores and Craft Stores.

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TEXT: Gift Stores - NC

Book/Souvenir Stores

Museum of North Carolina Minerals - MP 331 (open year round)
Doughton Park Visitor Center - MP 241
Northwest Trading Post - MP 258.8
Linn Cove - MP 304.4
Linville Falls VC - 316.3
Craggy Gardens - MP 364.6
Asheville Visitor Center - MP 384.1 (open year round)
Waterrock Knob - MP 451


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TEXT: Craft Stores

Craft Stores
Northwest Trading Post - MP 258.8
Moses H Cone Estate - MP 294
Folk Art Center - MP 382.1


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TEXT: Bodies of Water - NC

This text label covers the topics below: Lakes and Ponds; Rivers; Waterfall Access.

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TEXT: Lakes and Ponds

Hare Mill Pond - MP 225
Price Lake - MP 296
Cold Prong Pond - MP 299

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TEXT: Rivers

Linville River - MP 316.6
French Broad River - MP 393.5
Oconaluftee River - MP 469 (end of Parkway, inside Great Smoky Mountains NP)


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TEXT: Waterfall Access - NC

Linville Falls Trailhead - MP 316.3

Crabtree Falls Trailhead - MP 339.6 (parking inside campground)

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TEXT: Nearby Communities - NC

West Jefferson: MP 229.5, US 21, Sparta 8 miles West and from there to West Jefferson is 30 miles


Boone: MP 276.4,  Junction of US 421 South/221 North to Boone 12 miles
OR MP 280 US 321 North 7 miles to Boone

OR MP 292,  US 321 South 2 miles to Blowing Rock, further to Lenoir 

Blowing Rock: MP 292, 2 miles on US 321 South
OR MP 305, US 221 South 3 miles to Linville or US221 North 15 miles to Blowing Rock

Spruce Pine: MP 317.5, US 221 to Spruce Pine 13 miles

Asheville Exits: MP 377.4 Craven Gap State Route 694/ Town Mountain Road
MP 382.6,  State Route 70 East to Black Mountain 9 miles or West to Asheville 
MP 384.7  US 74 West
MP 393.6,  State Route 191 North to Asheville 9 miles or south to Hendersonville and the Carl Sandburg National Historic Site 18 miles.

Waynesville: MP 411.8,  US 276 North 20 miles
Cradle of Forestry Visitor Center (US Forest Service), US 276 South 15 miles and to Pisgah Center for Wildlife Education, Pisgah National Forest trails and DuPont State Recreational Forest. 

OR MP 423.2,  State Route 215 North to Waynesville 23 miles,
OR MP 443,  US 23 North/ US 74 East 8 miles 


Sylva: MP 443, US 23 South/ US 74 West 12 miles 


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TEXT: Nearby Public Lands - NC

Parks and Forests

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IMAGE: Mile Post Marker

DESCRIPTION:

A cropped photo of the parkway's milepost marker 469. It is a 3-foot tall, triangular pyramid post made of light-gray cement and has the blue number "469" painted on it near the top. Weather has stained areas of the post black, especially in the lower portion of the post beneath the numbers.

CREDIT:

David Smart

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TEXT: Camping on the Parkway

MP 60.9:  Otter Creek
MP 86: Peaks of Otter
MP 120.5: Roanoke Mountain
MP 167.1: Rocky Knob
MP 239: Doughton Park
MP 297: Julian Price
MP 316.3: Linville Falls
MP 339.5: Crabtree Meadows
MP 408.6: Mount Pisgah

 
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TEXT: Picnic Areas Along the Parkway

MP 8.5 East side: Humpback Rocks
MP 86 East Side: Peaks of Otter
MP 154.5 East Side: Smart View
MP 169 West Side: Rocky Knob
MP 188 East Side: Groundhog Mountain
MP 217.5 East Side: Cumberland Knob
MP 239.2 East Side: Doughton Park
MP 271.9 East Side: Jeffress Park
MP 296.4 West Side: Julian Price Park
MP 316.5 East Side: Linville River
MP 339.5 East Side: Crabtree Meadows
MP 367.6 West Side: Craggy Gardens
MP 407.8 West Side: Mt Pisgah

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OVERVIEW: More Information

Blue Ridge Parkway Association
PO Box 2136
Asheville, NC 28802
828-670-1924

Other helpful contacts

Parkway Recorded Info Line: 828-271-4779

Parkway Campground Reservations:
www.recreation.gov

Blue Ridge Parkway Headquarters (Permits, Press and Legal): 828-348-3400

Area Information

If you’re looking for more information on a specific town near the Parkway, most communities have visitor centers to welcome you. They offer a wealth of regional info, maps, and brochures and would be glad to guide you in exploring their areas.

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