Aquarium of the Pacific — Visitor Guide and Map

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IMAGES: Babies of the Pacific! Visitor Guide & Map (Front Cover)



DESCRIBING: A vertical brochure cover

SYNOPSIS: The cover has four images of animals on an aqua background. They are stacked with three images of a bass and desert tortoise, roughly the same size at the top, side by side, with a similar sized cuttlefish right below the bass, and a much larger image of a sea otter below the tortoise. 

IMAGE 1 of 4: Juvenile Giant Sea Bass

DESCRIPTION: This illustration of a juvenile giant sea bass has depicted with its head pointing towards the right of the page. The clear tail is towards the left of the page. The body is orange with lots of small black spots. The dorsal fin starting a bit taller in height at the head and tapers as it goes to the tail. Instead of the dorsal fin being smooth, there are visible spines one iconic feature of many juvenile fish.

IMAGE 2 of 4: Desert Tortoise

DESCRIPTION: 

SYNOPSIS: This is describing a cartoon image of a young desert tortoise floating on a light blue background. From our viewpoint, we can see the tortoise from its left side, with the head, neck, front two legs, and back left leg all visible coming out of the domed shell. The tortoise is facing us from the side profile, showing us a circular black eye, a small circle for a nostril, and a thin line curved up at the end for the mouth, as if the tortoise is smiling.

IN-DEPTH DESCRIPTION: There are shadows beneath the tortoise, as well as on the front right leg and back left leg, to show that it is standing on some sort of ground, though the ground is not distinguishable from the rest of the background blue shade.  The legs are part of how we identify this animal as a tortoise, as they are thick and trunk-like rather than webbed like a turtle; each foot visible also shows 4 small oval nails at the end of it.  The head is rectangular with slightly rounded edges, and a small portion of the thick cylindrical neck is shown peeping out of the shell. The skin on the tortoise's head, neck, and legs is all a light yellowish-green, with some pale yellow spots and light brown spots scattered throughout. The top of the shell (the carapace) is domed up, forming a half circle at the very top. The shell consists of golden yellow scales with a light brown shading in the very center of each scale and dark brown shading between the scales, connecting them all together. The scales are in freeform hexagonal shapes, with smaller rectangular scales along the bottom edge of the carapace. The bottom of the carapace forms a curved line starting above the head of the tortoise and curving down along the body until it reaches the legs. The underbelly is just barely visible connecting to the top shell, and it is a dingy greenish-brown, showing that it is shaded by the top of the tortoise.

IMAGE 3 of 4: Cuttle Fish

DESCRIPTION:A cartoon illustration of a wide, oval shaped aquatic animal with dusty yellow-gold skin floats in front of a light, aqua-blue background. Moving from left to right, the animal's body reads tail, body, then head. Even though these features are identifiable, this aquatic animal does not have pronounced segments of it's body; it's all quite blobbish. It's head region, is the same size as the rest of the body. The viewer can only see the half of the fish that is facing us--half of the tail, one set of fins, one eye, and one set of short tentacles by the mouth. Because of the distinct black, "w" shaped pupils on the animal's light blue eye, the viewer can assume this to be a cuttlefish (and they would be correct)! Below the eye, drops a thick, girthy tentacle that is a darker shade of gold. Cascading from where the nose would be is a set of short, fingerlike tentacles. This cuttlefish has a narrow ribbon-like fin that runs along the center of its body from the head to the tail. It's tail is short and from the semi-translucent illustration, appears to be squishy.

IMAGE 4 of 4: Sea Otter

DESCRIPTION: An illustration of a sea otter floating in the water. Ripples surround the otter's brown body in a lighter blue. One paw is over its chest as if it was holding something. The otter's head is light brown. Its nose is triangular in shape. Two small ears are barely visible on the head to help give a sense of fluffiness of a sea otter's fur.

CREDIT: Aquarium of the Pacific



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TEXT: General Information (Page 4)



RELATED TEXT: Welcome to the Aquarium of the Pacific. Use this Visitor Guide and Map to discover the wonders of the ocean.



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TEXT: First Aid and Emergencies and Lost and Found (Page 4)



RELATED TEXT: If possible, please proceed to Member Services near the main entrance, or contact the nearest staff member.


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TEXT: No Smoking or Gum (Page 4)



RELATED TEXT: Smoking, vaping, gum, and balloons are not allowed in the Aquarium. Please use trash and recycling bins. Do not toss objects into the exhibits.


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TEXT: Visitor Information (Page 4)



RELATED TEXT: Visit Member Services located in the Great Hall near the main entrance to inquire about tours, Aquarium membership, and special events.


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TEXT: Refreshments (Page 4)



RELATED TEXT: Café Scuba on level two serves a selection of sandwiches, salads, and grilled entrees, including sustainable seafood and vegan options. Bamboo Bistro offers pizza, hot dogs, cold beer, and refreshments. The Blue Whale Café in the Great Hall serves coffee, cappuccinos, sodas, and snacks.


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TEXT: Restrooms and Baby Care Station (Page 4)



RELATED TEXT: See map for restroom locations. There are changing stations in all restrooms on levels one and two in the Great Hall and by Shark Lagoon. A baby care room is located off of the first floor women’s restroom.


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TEXT: Visitors with Disabilities (Page 4)



RELATED TEXT: Wheelchairs are available at Member Services. All exhibits are wheelchair accessible. See map for the location of elevators throughout the Aquarium. Audio tours and Braille Visitor Guides for guests who are blind are available. Special devices and Epson smart glasses are available in the Honda Pacific Visions Theater for those who are deaf or blind. Visit Member Services for details.


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TEXT: Sensory Processing Needs (Page 4)



RELATED TEXT: The Aquarium is certified by Kulture City as a facility that is inclusive of visitors with sensory processing needs. The Quiet Zone is marked on our visitor guide map, and Headphone Zones are marked with signs throughout the Aquarium. Visitors may check out sensory bags at the Member Services Desk. Visit kulturecity.org for information on this program.


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TEXT: Amazing Pictures (Page 4)



RELATED TEXT: Purchase a unique souvenir of your Aquarium visit with this fun photo opportunity located in the Great Hall.


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TEXT: Credit Cards (Page 4)



RELATED TEXT: We accept VISA, MasterCard, Discover, and American Express.


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IMAGE and TEXT: Recycling Statement (Page 4)



DESCRIBING: A logo for recycling


SYNOPSIS: In the shape of a triangle, there are three arrows curved where the points of the triangle would. The arrowheads are pointed towards another arrow.


CREDIT: Aquarium of the Pacific


RELATED TEXT: Please help the Aquarium achieve zero waste by disposing of all trash properly during your visit. Our trash bins are separated for trash, recyclables, and food waste, which is composted on site. You can also pour out liquids into special collection bins.



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TEXT: Additional Adventures (Page 4)



RELATED TEXT: The programs below have an additional cost. Visit Member Services for times, pricing, and availability. For reservations, please call (562) 590-3100

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TEXT: Animal Encounters (Page 4)



DESCRIBING: [Describe the type of thing you are describing here, i.e. A small, black-and-white photograph]

SYNOPSIS: [~ 1 paragraph overview, 4 to 8 chunks of information; hit the highlights]

IN-DEPTH DESCRIPTION: [The rest of the description, if needed]

CAPTION: [Caption goes here]

CREDIT: [Credit goes here]

RELATED TEXT: [Related text goes here]


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TEXT: Harbor Tours (Page 4)



DESCRIBING: [Describe the type of thing you are describing here, i.e. A small, black-and-white photograph]

SYNOPSIS: [~ 1 paragraph overview, 4 to 8 chunks of information; hit the highlights]

IN-DEPTH DESCRIPTION: [The rest of the description, if needed]

CAPTION: [Caption goes here]

CREDIT: [Credit goes here]

RELATED TEXT: [Related text goes here]


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TEXT: Whale Watching (Page 4)



DESCRIBING: [Describe the type of thing you are describing here, i.e. A small, black-and-white photograph]

SYNOPSIS: [~ 1 paragraph overview, 4 to 8 chunks of information; hit the highlights]

IN-DEPTH DESCRIPTION: [The rest of the description, if needed]

CAPTION: [Caption goes here]

CREDIT: [Credit goes here]

RELATED TEXT: [Related text goes here]


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IMAGE and TEXT: Visitor App (Page 4)



DESCRIBING:  A color photo of a smartphone

SYNOPSIS: The smartphone has the loading screen for the Aquarium of the Pacific Visitor Guide app. What is pictured is a large zebra shark low to the habitat floor with corals in the background. The zebra shark is front facing and close up, showing mostly its light brown coloration, rounded nose, and mouth in a straight line.

CREDIT: Aquarium of the Pacific

RELATED TEXT: Download our Visitor App from the App Store or the Play Store. It features show schedules, interactive maps, animal IDs, and more.


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TEXT: Aquarium Wifi (Page 4)



DESCRIBING: [Describe the type of thing you are describing here, i.e. A small, black-and-white photograph]

SYNOPSIS: [~ 1 paragraph overview, 4 to 8 chunks of information; hit the highlights]

IN-DEPTH DESCRIPTION: [The rest of the description, if needed]

CAPTION: [Caption goes here]

CREDIT: [Credit goes here]

RELATED TEXT: [Related text goes here]


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TEXT: Ocean Theater (Page 5)



The heading is a blue box with the words Ocean Theater inside and a number 5. The number 5 correlates to where you can find Ocean Theater on the map on Page 2.

RELATED TEXT: The Aquarium's Ocean Theater off the Great Hall on the first floor features free educational and 3D films. Visit the theater kiosk or Aquarium app for show times.



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IMAGE and TEXT: Restoring Coral Reefs (Page 5)



DESCRIBING: A vertical rectangular color photograph with rounded edges and a light blue border.


SYNOPSIS: This is a photo of a section of a coral reef, showing only a small close-up portion of the reef. The corals in the photo are large and flat, stacking up vertically in the photo in 4-5 layers, like a series of asymmetrical shelves. The colors of the reef are vibrant, mixing bright yellow, rust orange, light pink, and deep violet throughout the image.


IN-DEPTH DESCRIPTION: The corals themselves are plate corals, with bright yellow and rust orange colors. The corals are solid and the structures that they have built appear as wavy sheets, curving around rocks and each other. There is texture to the plates of coral, with small bumps scattered almost uniformly over them. The rocks that the corals are attached to peek through the coral growth, as well as appear in the top and bottom right corners. The colors of the rocks change from black, white, light pink, and deep violet due to the different types of rock available, the shadows from the plated corals, and the different types of algae growing on top of the rock. The light pink is a crusting algae that is a hard thin layer on top of the rock. The deep violet is a more plant-like algae, appearing fuzzy and soft.


CREDIT: Ken Kurtis


RELATED TEXT: Learn about efforts to rebuild and protect our coral reefs through this short film that plays daily.


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TEXT: Ocean Science Center (Page 5)



The heading is a blue box with the words Ocean Science Center inside and a number 5. The number 5 correlates to where you can find Ocean Science Center on the map on Page 2.

RELATED TEXT: The Ocean Science Center uses the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Science on a Sphere to tell stories about our planet. See the Ocean Science Center entrance for posted show times.



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IMAGE and TEXT: Shows (Page 5)



DESCRIBING: A cut-out colored image of two circles partially overlapping. 


SYNOPSIS: There are two spheres partially overlapping, with the sphere on the right in front of and a bit lower than the sphere on the left. Both spheres show different images of coral reefs, which are parts of a movie that plays in the Ocean Science Center. 


IN-DEPTH DESCRIPTION: The sphere on the right is sectioned into three parts, with the middle wedge of the sphere making up over two-thirds of the surface. This middle image shows a coral reef in the bottom half.  Making your way down from the center of the image, there are turquoise blue and teal corals that look soft and gelatinous, and are made up of a lots of small circles, appearing like bubbles. At the bottom of the image, there is a sponge creating a hard crust on the rock, which appears bright orangeish red. In the top half of the image, we see the wide expanse of blue ocean in the back, and seven small black fish swimming facing the right side, with one white spot visible on that side. The two wedges on the left and right sides of the middle main wedge are barely visible and almost mirror each other, with bright turquoise ocean scattered with small yellow fish appearing like dots making up the top half, and a brownish yellow tube-like coral reef making up the bottom half.

The sphere on the left shows a smaller circle on the left-side with a coral reef in the middle. The background of the sphere behind the circle is a map, changing between deep blue for ocean and green and beige for land, with the island nation of Palau labeled in white next to the circle. Within the circle, we have a view of part of a solid coral reef, with the reef itself containing a mix of bright orange, light pink, light purple, light yellow, and brown. These colors change due to different types of stony or hard corals (some are sheet-like, others are more branching), tube-like sponges, algaes forming a hard layer on rocks, and soft fuzzy algaes growing up from the reef. There is a diver swimming up above the reef towards the left side of the image through a school or group of over a dozen small yellow fish. The diver swims across a turquoise ocean, which is made bright from the sunshine coming in from up above. 


CREDIT: [Credit goes here]


RELATED TEXT: SHOWS: Learn about environmental issues affecting the ocean and how you can take action. Watch movies featuring music, narration, and Spanish-language subtitles, or join an educator and explore Earth. Four shows from the Aquarium's library play on rotation throughout the day.


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IMAGE and TEXT: Southern California and Baja Gallery (Page 6)



DESCRIBING: A small circular photograph in color with a light yellow border. 


SYNOPSIS: This shows the head and front half of a semi-bullet shaped fish, facing towards the right side. The fish is a blend of colors, between reddish-brown, rust orange, yellow, white, and beige. This animal is a rockfish, a native Southern California species. 


IN-DEPTH DESCRIPTION: Starting at the right side, we see the head ot the fish, which has an average circular black eye surrounded by a ring of yellow. The mouth is large, with the top jaw line sloping at a downwards diagonal from just beneath the nostrils. Directly past the head, we can see the start of the dorsal (back) fin, which is made up of vertical spines with thin skin between them; the fin is spread out like a handfan along its back. On the right side of the fish, in line with where the dorsal fin starts on the back, we see a stretched C-shaped curved line, which is the line showing the piece of skin that covers the gills. Continuing back from the gill line along the side of the fish, we see the start of the side (pectoral) fin; the long thin horizontal spines are tightly packed with translucent skin between them. These fins are sturdy, allowing the rockfish to maneauver through small spaces on the rocks. The fish has a flat bottom with two shaded fins stretched out from underneath it, with a similar structure of the pectoral fin. 


CREDIT: Aquarium of the Pacific


RELATED TEXT: This gallery represents the Southern California and Baja coasts, between Point Conception in Santa Barbara and the tip of Baja California, Mexico.



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MAP: First Floor Gallery Map (Page 6)



DESCRIBING: A map depicting part of the first floor of the Aquarium of the Pacific. 


SYNOPSIS: This map shows part of the first floor of the Aquarium of the Pacific, starting in the large, cavernous Great Hall and entering into the narrow Southern California and Baja Gallery. This portion of the aquarium highlights the ecosystems and animals in Southern California and Baja Mexico, which is our local ecosystem here in Long Beach, California. We can find ecosystems like kelp forests and rocky reefs, along with key animals like California sea lions, spiny lobsters, and giant sea bass.


IN-DEPTH DESCRIPTION: At the end of the Great Hall of the aquarium, you will find the Honda Blue Cavern exhibit looming up 28 feet tall. If you place the Blue Cavern exhibit on your left and continue forward, you will reach the Amber Forest exhibit on your left and stairs going up to the second floor about 30 feet away to the right. Continuing forward with Amber Forest on your left, the narrow pathway curves into a U-shape around Amber Forest. As you walk this U-shaped path, Amber Forest will stay on your left as you sequentially come across the Redondo Submarine Canyon exhibit, Southern California Kelp Forest exhibit, Southern Australia Kelp Forest exhibit, Spiny Lobsters exhibit, Abalone exhibit, Breakwater exhibit, and Sea Jellies exhibits. Continuing past the Sea Jellies exhibits, the pathway straightens out and at the end, it turns to the right. When you turn to the right, you will enter the Seal and Sea Lion Underwater Viewing Tunnel, with curved viewing windows on both the right and left. This cylindrical tunnel guides you out of the gallery, to the the first floor outdoor exhibits of the aquarium. 

There is an icon of a red box containing an arrow going up and one going down, which denotes an elevator. When standing facing Honda Blue Cavern, this elevator is located in a hallway to the left, about 10 feet down. 

There is a picture of a round embossing medallion on the map. It contains a cartoon drawing of the face of a California Sheephead fish. This shows where the inkless stamp can be found to be pressed into the guidebook. The drawing of this fish shows a tall forehead and 4 sharp teeth visible in the open mouth, with two on the top jaw and two on the bottom jaw. There is a fin on either side of the fish, with its left fin looking larger because that side of the fish is slightly more visible, including the left eye. When standing with your back to the Blue Cavern exhibit, the stamp is located against the right wall, about 30 feet forward from the glass of the exhibit.

There are dark blue circles with numbers in them next to some of the exhibit names, which tells you the page in the guidebook where you can learn more. More information on the Honda Blue Cavern is on page 7, on the Amber Forest and Abalone exhibits is on page 8, and on Seals and Sea Lions is on page 9. 


CREDIT: Aquarium of the Pacific



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MAP: Second Floor Gallery Map (Page 6)



DESCRIBING: A map depicting part of the second floor of the Aquarium of the Pacific. 


SYNOPSIS: This map shows part of the second floor of the Aquarium of the Pacific, both indoors and outdoors. Some of the animals that can be viewed include Magellanic penguins, shorebirds that live along the Southern California coast, and harbor seals. This is also an area where Southern California local species of rays, including bat rays, can be touched.

LEGEND: There is an icon of a red box containing an arrow going up and one going down, which denotes an elevator. The legend also contains a black and white drawing of a hand with the pointer finger and middle finger placed together, with all of the other fingers curled under; this tells us where an area to touch animals is. When there is a dark blue circle with a number inside, this tells you where a guide stop is, with the number telling you what page to turn to to learn more. 

IN-DEPTH DESCRIPTION: Starting on the second level of the aquarium on the narrow bridge-like walkway, we can see the top of the Honda Blue Cavern exhibit about 30 feet in front of us, as it is almost three stories tall. To find an elevator, place the Blue Cavern exhibit on your right, and move to the end of the bridge-like walkway. At the end of that walkway, make a right, and there is an elevator about 20 feet ahead. If you place the Blue Cavern exhibit on your left side and move forward, you will reach the Gulf of California gallery, which has a rectangular coral reef exhibit on the left and the Garden Eels exhibit on the right. Walking through this short gallery, you will quickly find the doors to exit the gallery and reach the exhibits on the outdoor second floor. As you head outside, the Ray Habitat Touchpool is on the right, which is where you can touch different types of rays. On the left, there is a viewing window for the top of the Seal and Sea Lion exhibit. As you reach the Ray Habitat Touchpool, keeping the exhibit on your right, there is a small step going down. Continuing about 10 feet forward from the step down, there is a small step going up. Just past the Ray Habitat Touchpool, if you take a right, the Ray Habitat will stay on your right and the Shorebird Sanctuary will be on your left. The Ray Habitat is circular so you can walk all the way around. If you place the Shorebird Sanctuary on your right, moving forward the stairs down to the Seal and Sea Lion auditorium will be on your left and the June Keyes Penguin Habitat will be on your right, slightly around a bend in the walkway to the right. Continuing forward with the Penguin Habitat on your right, there is another set of stairs down to the Seal and Sea Lion auditorium, about 30 feet from the first. These stairs can also take you to the first floor outdoor exhibits. To the right of the stairs and just past the Penguin Habitat, there is an elevator. 

There is a picture on the map of a round embossing medallion. It contains a cartoon drawing of an American Avocet, a type of shorebird. This shows where the inkless stamp can be found to be pressed into the guidebook. The drawing of the bird shows it standing with ripples around its feet, as if it is in water. The bird has a long thin beak and long thin legs, with the legs taking up about half its size. The body is teardrop-shaped, with the curve where the round head is attached and pointed area being the tail or end of the bird. There is a curved line on the body of the bird to show where the wing is placed, and there are zig-zags on top of the wing to denote the layers of feathers. 

On the bottom right hand corner of the map, there is a small icon of a smartphone. The smartphone has the loading screen for the Aquarium of the Pacific Visitor Guide app. What is pictured on the loading screen is a large zebra shark low to the habitat floor with colorful corals in the background. The zebra shark is front facing and close up, showing mostly its light brown coloration, rounded nose, and mouth in a straight line.

FOR MORE INFORMATION: More information on the Honda Blue Cavern is on page 7, on the Gulf of California is on page 16, on the Ray Habitat Touchpool and the Shorebird Sanctuary is on page 15, on the Seals and Sea Lions is on page 9, and on the June Keyes Penguin Habitat is on page 14. 

CREDIT: Aquarium of the Pacific

RELATED TEXT: INTERACTIVE MAP: Download our Visitor Guide Mobile App!



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IMAGES and TEXT: Honda Blue Cavern (Page 7)



RELATED TEXT: This exhibit is modeled after Blue Cavern Point, a marine protected area along the coast of Catalina Island. How many species of animals can you find in this kelp forest habitat?

IMAGE 1 of 4

DESCRIBING: A cut out color photograph of the profile view of a leopard shark with no background

SYNOPSIS: A profile view of left side of the leopard shark. It is brown and beige striped shark growing up to three feet long with two dorsal fins, and three sets of paired fins on the lower portion of its body. Its forked tail is split in to an upper and lower portion with the upper portion sticking out about twice as long as the lower.

IN-DEPTH DESCRIPTION: This shark has a vertically flattened body shape – similar to as if a tube had been flattened on the bottom and slightly pointed at the top. The front of the shark’s nose or snout comes to a small, rounded point. Its small mouth is on the underside of it’s body, and the shark has two, fixed, lidless eyes, one on each side of it’s head, in line with its mouth. They are small and tan colored with slightly rectangular pupils. About halfway down its body the shark has a main triangular dorsal fin on its back and another smaller triangular dorsal fin on its back near the base of its tail. On the side of the shark near its head, it has five gill slits. At the end of the gill slits starts the first set of pectoral fins that attach to the shark on its side, closer to its belly than its back. There is another smaller set of similar fins halfway down the body. The shark has a final set of fins along the lower side called anal fins. They are the smallest size of the three sets, and still triangular shaped, placed at the base of the tail. The shark has a heteroceral tail, which just means the upper lobe of the tail is taller or longer than the lower lobe. The leopard shark is beige or tan colored with thick, brown bands or stripes across its back from head to tail, and a lighter cream-colored belly and underside.

CAPTION: Leopard Shark (Triakis semifasciata)

CREDIT: Aquarium of the Pacific

RELATED TEXT: Leopard Shark (Triakis semifasciata)

IMAGE 2 of 4

DESCRIBING: A cut out color photograph of the left profile of a white sea bass

SYNOPSIS: The white sea bass is shown in profile. It is a large fish with a torpedo or elongated bullet shape. It has a large mouth, one set of pectoral fins, two median fins on its belly – median fins are on the midline of the fish’s body – a spiny dorsal fin on the last third of its back, and a truncated, or triangular shaped tail.

IN-DEPTH DESCRIPTION: The white sea bass is a long torpedo shape and ranges in color from silver towards the front and underside and light brown on its back and tail end. It is covered in scales. The tail end of the fish looks darker as it is in shadow. It has a large, wide lipless mouth, and small, light tan, forward facing, fixed eyes with round black pupils. The fish’s gills are covered by an operculum, or a bony flap that hides the actual gill slits. On the lower side of the bass about a third of the way down from the mouth are the pectoral fins. They are an elongated shape. The fish also has a small triangular shaped median fin in the center of its belly, and another similarly shaped anal fin right at the base of the tail. The dorsal fin runs the length of the last third of the fish’s body along its spine and its tail is a truncated or triangular shape. All its fins are spiny with a sort of membrane or web in between.

CAPTION: White Sea Bass (Atractoscion nobilis)

CREDIT: Aquarium of the Pacific

RELATED TEXT: White Sea Bass (Atractoscion nobilis)

IMAGE 3 of 4

DESCRIBING: A cut out, color photograph of a left profile of a female California sheephead.

SYNOPSIS: The female California Sheephead is shown in left profile and is mostly a red-orange color with some cream colored, yellow, and blue accents. It has one set of pectoral fins, two median fins on its belly, a dorsal fin on the last fourth of its body along the spine and a truncated tail.

IN-DEPTH DESCRIPTION: The California sheephead has a fusiform or elongated torpedo shaped body, similar to a tube with the sides squished in. The fish is mainly covered in orange scales with a few other colors along the fins. She has a forward facing, mouth and bulbous, medium sized, eyes on either side of its head. She has orange eyes with circular black pupils in a socket similar to humans – so she is able to move them and see in different directions. The sheephead’s gills are covered by an operculum, or bony plate. Just next to that is its pectoral fin, on the side of its body. The pectoral fin has bright orange spines and a translucent membrane between them. Directly below that, on the fish’s belly is another fin. It is triangle shaped and a light-yellow color that fades to a blue on the edge closer to the tail of the fish. The sheephead also has a dorsal and anal fin directly across from each other at the base of the tail on the back and belly of the fish, that are the same shape and color as each other. They are larger than the other two fins and triangular shaped angled towards the tail of the fish. The color of both fins starts as an orange color on the side towards the mouth of the fish and fading in to yellow and blue towards the tail. The sheephead’s tail is truncated, also spined and good for turning quickly. The start of the fish’s tail is yellow that fades to blue.

CAPTION: California Sheephead [Female] (Semicossyphus pulcher)

CREDIT: Aquarium of the Pacific

RELATED TEXT: California Sheephead [Female] (Semicossyphus pulcher)

IMAGE 4 of 4

DESCRIBING: A cut out color photograph of the left profile a giant sea bass

SYNOPSIS: The giant sea bass is a very large fish growing up to seven feet in length. It has a football shaped body and its coloring ranges from pale off white to a light brown in a mottled pattern across its body with large black spots across its body and tail but not its face. The sea bass has one set of pectoral fins on its side, a median fin on its belly, a dorsal and anal fin, and a truncated tail. The image is accompanied by a badge indicating this is a vanishing, or endangered animal.

IN-DEPTH DESCRIPTION: The giant sea bass is quite big as its name suggests. It has a large, forward facing, wide mouth at the front of its football shaped body with an eye on each side of its head. Its eyes are bulbous, tan colored, with round black pupils and they are not fixed. The fish can move them and look in different directions. It has an operculum – or bony flap - that covers its gill slits. Right next to the gill slits on the side of the fish’s body are its pectoral fins. They are somewhat spiny and a blackish blue color. Directly below that on the belly of the fish is another set of fins of a similar shape, size, and color. On the last third of its body the sea bass has a dorsal and anal fin directly in line with each other on the top and bottom of its body at the base of its tail. They are triangular shaped, with the apex pointing slightly towards the tail. The fish’s tail is truncated, or triangular shaped and a mottled black and grey color. The giant sea bass’s scales are a range of colors from pale off white to a light brown in a mottled pattern across its body with large black spots covering its body and tail but not its face.

CAPTION: Giant Sea Bass (Stereopsis gigas)

CREDIT: Aquarium of the Pacific

RELATED TEXT: Giant Sea Bass (Stereopsis gigas)




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IMAGE and TEXT: California Sheephead (male) (Page 7 Sidebar)



DESCRIBING: A cut out color photograph of a male California Sheephead

SYNOPSIS: The male California sheephead has the same body shape as the female fish – a fusiform shape, however it has a much blunt front of its face. Its head, last third of its body, and tail are all black with some faint red-orange details. The sheephead has a white chin. The middle of its body is white on the bottom and red-orange on the top. It has a red eye on either side of its body, and we can see two teeth on the bottom jaw in its open mouth.

IN-DEPTH DESCRIPTION: The male California sheephead is a football shaped fish that has been squished in a bit on both sides. It has a blunt front nose or snout area with its mouth on the lower portion of its front. Its mouth is partially open which shows off the two very small teeth at the front of its bottom jaw. The sheephead has a black face with a white chin and we can see that it has a bulbous, red eye with a round black pupil. It has a bony flap or operculum covering its gills right on the boarder of its black scales. The next third of the fish’s body is a light orange color on its top or dorsal side, which fades to white on its belly or ventral side. Right behind the operculum is the pectoral fin on the side of its body. The pectoral fin is small and has light orange spines and a translucent membrane between them. Slightly farther back along the sheephead’s body, on the belly of the fish is another set of fins. They are an elongated triangle curving back towards the tail. The edges of those fins are black fading to dark blue and to white with a little bit of pale orange on the forward edge. The last third of the fish’s body is mostly black scales with some light orange scales speckled throughout. The image is cut off right before the tail fin. The fish also has a dorsal fin on its back and an anal fin on its belly right at the base of the tail. They are larger than the other fins, and triangularly shaped and leaning slightly towards the tail end. The fins edges are black, fading to deep blue and finally pale orange the closer they get to the fish’s body.

CAPTION: All sheephead are females when they hatch. After a few years, when they reach a certain size, some permanently change into males to keep the population balanced.

CREDIT: Aquarium of the Pacific

RELATED TEXT: California Sheephead [male] (Semicossyphus pulcher)




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IMAGES and TEXT: Amber Forest (Page 8)



DESCRIBING: Six color cut out photographs of ocean animals. Five are the right side profiles of different fish. One is an aerial view of a sea star.

RELATED TEXT: The amber forest exhibit represents the diverse marine life that depends on kelp forests. Some animals are easy to spot, whilte others hide in the kelp.

IMAGE 1 of 6

DESCRIBING: A small cut out color photograph of the right profile of a treefish.

SYNOPSIS: The treefish is a football shaped fish with yellow and green coloring and thick black stripes. It has triangular pectoral fins and a truncated tail.

IN-DEPTH DESCRIPTION: The treefish has a football shaped body with a mouth at the forward-facing tip and a small black eye on either side of its face. We can see the operculum – or the bony flap covering its gills. Moving a bit more towards the tail of the fish it has a light green pectoral fin on the lower side of its body. Across the fish’s entire spine, there is a spiny, light green dorsal fin that gets larger on the last third of its body. On the fish’s belly in the middle of it’s body it has another small fin that gradually gets larger towards the tail end of the fish. Right at the base of the tail still on the belly of the fish, there is another similar fin in a larger size. The tail of the fish is truncated, or triangular shaped with a blunt edge. The fish’s body is covered in light yellow scales and thick black bands or stripes running from side to side.

CAPTION: Treefish (Sebastes serriceps)

CREDIT: Aquarium of the Pacific

RELATED TEXT: Treefish (Sebastes serriceps)

IMAGE 2 of 6

DESCRIBING: A small color cut out photograph of the right profile of a blue rockfish

SYNOPSIS: The blue rockfish is a torpedo shaped, silvery-blue fish with dark grey and black fins. It has small black spots over its entire body. This fish has wing shaped pectoral fins and a triangular tail.

IN-DEPTH DESCRIPTION: The blue rockfish has a torpedo shaped body with a pointed face. Its wide, slightly downturned mouth is right at the front of its body and it has a small black eye on either side of its body. The edge of the operculum is visible behind the eye and in front of the pectoral fin. The pectoral fin is on the side of the fish’s body in the lower third. It is slightly wing shaped and fades from dark grey to silvery blue. On the belly of the fish it has two median fins – or fins in the middle of its body. The first one is small and dark grey, right under the pectoral fin. Towards the base of the tail of the fish is another triangular fin that is angled towards the tail. Directly opposite that large fin on the spine of the animal is a similarly shaped and colored dorsal fin. The fish’s tail is truncated with a blunt edge that is dark grey colored. The entire fish is covered in silvery blue scales with smaller dark grey designs.

CAPTION: Blue rockfish (Sebastes mystinus)

CREDIT: Aquarium of the Pacific

RELATED TEXT: Blue rockfish (Sebastes mystinus)

IMAGE 3 of 6

DESCRIBING: A small color photograph of the aerial view of an orange bat star with yellow spots

SYNOPSIS: This bat star is shaped like a star and mainly orange colored with some small yellow spots. It has five arms that are thinner at the tip and get thicker as they go back to the body of the animal in the center.

IN-DEPTH DESCRIPTION: The bat star is shaped like a five pointed star with no visible face or eyes. We are looking at the top of the animal. It is thicker in the center of the body with five short arms that have a sort of webbing between them. The bat star is slightly varying shades of orange over its entire body with some yellow spots in the center of its body. The tip of each arm is curled up showing just the tiniest bit of its pale yellow colored underside.

CAPTION: Bat star (Patiria miniata)

CREDIT: Aquarium of the Pacific

RELATED TEXT: Bat star (Patiria miniata)

IMAGE 4 of 6

DESCRIBING: A small color photograph of the right side profile of a Garibaldi.

SYNOPSIS: The garibaldi is a bright orange, oval shaped fish, with a protruding two lobed tail.

IN-DEPTH DESCRIPTION: The garibaldi is an orange, oval shaped fish with small mouth at the very front of its short pointed face. It has a light blue eye with a round black pupil. The edge of the operculum or bony flap covering the gills is slightly visible in front of the pectoral fin. The pectoral fin is spiny and very bright orange on the lower side of the fish. Moving down to the belly of the fish it has a small orange oval shaped fin. Along the belly towards the base of its tail is a larger, orange, triangular shaped fin angled towards the tail of the fish. There is another similarly shaped and colored fin along the fish’s spine on the dorsal or top of the fish. It’s tail seems almost to be a small, sideways heart shape on the thick stem-like protrusion.

CAPTION: Garibaldi (Hypsypops rubicundus)

CREDIT: Aquarium of the Pacific

RELATED TEXT: Garibaldi (Hypsypops rubicundus)

IMAGE 5 of 6

DESCRIBING: A small color cut out photograph of the right profile of a flag rockfish.

SYNOPSIS: The flag rockfish is a football shaped fish with a spined dorsal fin, truncated tail, and pointed mouth. It is orange and white striped vertically from nose to tail.

IN-DEPTH DESCRIPTION: The flag rockfish has a football shaped body with a slightly downturned mouth at the pointed end of the front of its face. It has a medium sized black eye and the ridge of the operculum or bony flap covering the gills is very pronounced. The fish has a spined pectoral fin on the lower side of its body and another similarly shaped fin on it’s belly directly under the pectoral fin. It has a spined dorsal fin along its spine for the last two thirds of its body, with the last third protruding out a bit farther than the rest. Directly below that on the fish’s belly it has another spined, slightly triangular shaped fin at the base of its tail. It’s tail is truncated or triangular shaped. The mouth of the fish is orange and has alternating vertical orange and white strips across it’s whole body and ending in the tail. At the very edge of the tail there are some small horizontal black stripes along the spines of the tail.

CAPTION: Flag rockfish (Sebastes rubrivinctus)

CREDIT: Aquarium of the Pacific

RELATED TEXT: Flag rockfish (Sebastes rubrivinctus)

IMAGE 6 of 6

DESCRIBING: A small cut out color photograph of the right profile view of a black rockfish.

SYNOPSIS: The black rockfish is a fusiform or bullet shaped fish. It is silvery with some tan spots on its sides and black spots on its back.

IN-DEPTH DESCRIPTION: The bullet shaped body of the black rockfish has a slightly pointed face with a large, wide mouth at the very front. Its mouth is slightly downturned. It has a large light beige eye with a round black pupil. The operculum ridge curves up from the bottom of the fish towards the top about halfway across its body. Behind that is the fish’s pectoral fin and it is a dark tan color. Right underneath on the fish’s belly is a set of long and narrow fins. The black rockfish has an angled, triangular shaped, dark grey dorsal fin that covers the last third of its spine before its tail. There is another similarly shaped and colored fin along the last third of the fish’s belly. The rockfish’s tail is a triangular shape and a dark blue gray.

CAPTION: Black rockfish (Sebastes melanops)

CREDIT: Aquarium of the Pacific

RELATED TEXT: Black rockfish (Sebastes melanops)




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IMAGE and TEXT: Yutaka (Page 8)



IN-DEPTH DESCRIPTION: Yutaka, the juvenile giant sea bass is shown resting on a sea floor made of many pebbles ranging in color from light blue to dark grey. Yutaka is a football shaped with a pointed face. Its mouth is large, wide, and forward facing at the very front of its body. We can see the pronounced ridge of the operculum protecting the gills and hiding them from sight. Yutaka has two dark grey or black fins along its belly, one at the middle of its body and another and a smaller one at the base of its tail. The sea bass has a spiny dorsal fin along the last two thirds of its back. The last third of the dorsal fin before the tail protrudes much more than the rest. It’s tail is triangular shaped or truncated. Yutaka is white and dark grey with large round spots all over its body. The dorsal fin, tail, and belly fin are all dark grey or black but outlined at the very edge in white. The background of the image is mostly in shadow but seems to be sea plants, rocks, and other environmental structures. Yutaka is very close in color to its environment and blends in well.

CAPTION: Look for our young giants sea bass, Yutaka, and compare this fish's size to its adult parents in the Honda Blue Cavern exhibit. Yutaka was the first giant sea bass to be successfully hatched and raised in human care. As a result, the Aquarium was part of an effort to raise these endangered fish, release them into the ocean, and track their movements.

CREDIT: Robin Riggs




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IMAGE and TEXT: Abalone (Page 8)



DESCRIBING: A circular color photograph of a white abalone with a yellow boarder.

SYNOPSIS: This is an aerial view of a White Abalone. White abalone are a type of mollusk or snail like animal, so most of the actual animal is hidden under the oval shaped shell. The shell is rather flat, with only a slight convex shape and a very rough and bumpy texture. The image is accompanied by a badge that indicates this is a vanishing or endangered animal.

IN-DEPTH DESCRIPTION: The white abalone shell is an oval shape with a rough and bumpy texture. A small, round, white protrusion at the end of the shell that is farthest away from the foreground of the photo. The edge of the shell on the left of the image has six small holes following the curve of the shell around to the end directly in front of the viewer of the photo. The shell is many different shades of brown, reddish brown, and white. All around the edge of the shell we can see small spikey looking protrusions coming from the animal underneath. They seem to be arms or very short tentacles. The abalone is shown on purplish colored rocks covered in tan colored sand.

CAPTION: The Aquarium has a behind-the-scenes abalone lab where red and white abalone are raised. Along with other aquariums, we are breeding endangered white abalone and releasing off the coast of Southern California to help this species avoid extinction.

CREDIT: Aquarium of the Pacific

RELATED TEXT: White abalone (Haliotis sorenseni)




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IMAGES and TEXT: Seals and Sea Lions (Page 9)



DESCRIBING: The seals and sea lion section of the Visitor’s Guide. There is a caption talking about some physical differences between the animals as well as two images, which are described.

CAPTION: Seals and sea lions live throughout our coastal waters. Sea lions can be identified by the presence of ear flaps and their ability to walk using their front flippers. Seals do not have ear flaps and move on their bellies on land.

IMAGE 1 of 2

DESCRIBING: A circular, colored photograph printed at the top right corner of the page

SYNOPSIS: A California sea lion fills most of the photograph; a pool with a blurry gradient from light blue to dark blue is in the background. There’s a small sliver of a visible rock formation that the sea lion is upon out of frame.

IN-DEPTH DESCRIPTION: The tan sea lion is pointing towards the center fold of the Visitor’s Guide. Its head is raise slightly exposing the lower lip with white whiskers draping over the lips. These whiskers can be followed towards the rounded, dark brown nose. Just behind the nose, the sea lion’s right eye is barely visible; however, the sea lion’s large left eye reflects light as a white colored glare. Finally, to the right of the left eye in the photograph, a small ear flap is visible.

CREDIT: Aquarium of the Pacific

RELATED TEXT: California Sea Lion (Zalophus californianus)

IMAGE 2 of 2

DESCRIBING: A rectangular, color photograph of a harbor seal printed just below the caption text.

SYNOPSIS: A harbor seal lays among a rock formation filling most of the photograph. Behind the seal, the photo is blurry with possibly more of the rock formation. The sides of two rocks are sharp focus with the seal: one just behind the seal and the other in front.

IN-DEPTH DESCRIPTION: The seal is facing the left side of the photo facing centerfold of the Visitor’s Guide. The head of the harbor seal is slightly lowered towards the left hiding the right eye. The left eye is completely visible. Thin white whiskers extend outward from the seal’s snout. The harbor seal’s right side is slightly visible behind the head with the flippers out of frame. The body of the seal is dark colored with cream-colored blotches unevenly distributed creating a marbled look to the animal. This pattern is also on the neck and through the head, even though the blotches are smaller.

CREDIT: Robing Riggs

RELATED TEXT: Harbor seal (Phoca vitulina)




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IMAGES and TEXT: Harbor Terrace (Page 9)



DESCRIBING: Four color photographs of animals to learn about at the Harbor Terrace.

CAPTION: This outdoor space overlooks Rainbow Harbor and features archerfish and mudskipper exhibits and the Moon Jelly Touch Lab. To get to Harbor Terrace, exit the rear doors of Pacific Collections gift store or follow the walkway to the left of Lorikeet Forest.

IMAGE 1 of 4

DESCRIBING: A color photograph of an Upside-Down Jelly

SYNOPSIS: This unusual jelly spends its life with its top or bell on the sandy bottom like in this photo. Its tentacles are curved inward almost created a false flower underwater. At the tips of some of these tentacles are green dots indicating the presence of algae. The sandy bottom is quite curved creating an illusion of small hills in the foreground. There other upside-down jellies in the background blending in with each other forming what most would identify as simply algae.

CREDIT: Aquarium of the Pacific

RELATED TEXT: Upside-Down Jelly (Cassiopeia xamachana)

IMAGE 2 of 4

DESCRIBING: A color photograph of an archerfish

SYNOPSIS: There are two archerfish in this photo with blurry yet bright green lines in the background. One of the archerfish is in the background out of focus almost in line with the bright green lines. The archerfish in focus is very clear with its pattern of almost five black half ovals. This fish has an upward facing mouth with a very flat dorsal or backside along the spine running the length of the fish. The fins are barely visible.

CREDIT: Robin Riggs

RELATED TEXT: Banded Archerfish (Toxotes jaculatrix)

IMAGE 3 of 4

DESCRIBING: A color image of a dwarf mudskipper

SYNOPSIS: This well-adapted fish has an almost of a light purple hue to its body. The head can be identified by the two orb-like eyes on top. The eyelids are barely visible. The modified pectoral fins or the side fins look like tiny muscle arms. The body extends out beyond the pectoral fins tapering into the tail.

CREDIT: Aquarium of the Pacific

RELATED TEXT: Dwarf Mudskipper (Periophthalmus novemradiatus)

IMAGE 4 of 4

DESCRIBING: A color image of a moon jelly

SYNOPSIS: There are two moon jellies with almost translucent against a black background. Below the image there is a symbol of a hand with the index and middle finger pointed out indicating there is a touch station at the Moon Jelly Touch Lab. The moon jelly in the foreground is showing off its short, tiny tentacles and its ribbon-like oral arms. The top or bell of the moon jelly has small indents. In the background, this moon jelly has its bell towards us; however, there are two visible horseshoe or “U” shapes. The edge of the bell is barely visible.

CREDIT: Robin Riggs

RELATED TEXT: Moon Jelly (Aurelia coerulea)




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IMAGES and TEXT: Lorikeet Forest (Page 10)



DESCRIBING: Three colored pictures of the lorikeet species at the aquarium.

CAPTION: Out aviary is home to more than seventy lorikeets native to Australia, Indonesia, and New Guinea. Purchase a small cup of nectar to feed to the lorikeets, and they are likely to land on your arm, shoulder, or head as you walk through the exhibit.

IMAGE 1 of 3

DESCRIBING: A color photo of the front of a Swainson’s lorikeet

SYNOPSIS: This photo shows the lorikeet’s head to the bottom of the chest. The chest has a orange with yellow patches where the green wings connect with the body. The head is mostly blue with green patch that curves around visible on the left side. This lorikeet has a red eye with a black pupil as well as a red, small, and curved beak.

CREDIT: Aquarium of the Pacific

RELATED TEXT: Swainson's Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus moloccanus)

IMAGE 2 of 3

DESCRIBING: A color profile photo of a green-naped lorikeet

SYNOPSIS: This photo shows the head and neck of this green-naped lorikeet as well as part of the chest. Named after its green and yellow patch on the neck, the green-naped lorikeet has a blue head and a small, curved, and red-orange beak. The chest has red with small lines of black of varying thicknesses. The green-naped lorikeet has a red eye with a large black pupil.

CREDIT: Aquarium of the Pacific

RELATED TEXT: Green-Naped Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus haematodus)

IMAGE 3 of 3

DESCRIBING: A color photo of the front of an Edward’s lorikeet

SYNOPSIS: The head to just below the feathers of the body are visible. The head has blue, green and yellow bands of feathers. The chest has bright yellow feathers, while the wings have green feathers. Dark blue feathers in a band are below the yellow chest. The Edward’s lorikeet has a red eye and large black pupil.

CREDIT: Aquarium of the Pacific

RELATED TEXT: Edward's Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus capistratus)




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IMAGE and TEXT: Southern California Steelhead Story (Page 10)



DESCRIBING: A rectangular, color photo of rainbow trout

SYNOPSIS: There rainbow trout float at a depth just above the blurry tips of rocks at the bottom of the photo. The trout are facing different directions showing off the pattern and form of the fish. With a slightly elongated football shaped body, the trout have several fins to help suspend themselves in the water. The body has a speckled appearance with black dots all over the side. In the background, there are blurry large boulders.

This is area is a designated quiet denoted by an orange square with a heart and headphones printed in the Visitor’s Guide.

CAPTION: This exhibit tells the story of the endangered Southern California steelhead fish, the threats it faces, and its importance in our local waterways.

CREDIT: Aquarium of the Pacific



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IMAGE and TEXT: Our Water Future (Page 10)



DESCRIBING: A color photo of the area of the aquarium called Our Water Future

SYNOPSIS: This photo of the area on a sunny day shows some of the activities guests can do to learn about water conservation for the local area. In the foreground, there is a map of the western part of the United States with small lights showing where the water comes from. There is a small visible portion of the large map of the local area in the middle ground of the photo. In the background, there are some other activites that focus on water usage in a home. The top of the photo is filled with the rain cover for the area providing some shade on the pictured sunny day.

CAPTION: Learn more about where our water comes from and ways to conserve water in our daily lives. See how you can save water at home with appliances, landscaping, and day-to-day activities.

CREDIT: Aquarium of the Pacific




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IMAGE and TEXT: Molina Animal Care Center (Page 11)



DESCRIBING: A color photo of a veterinarian and a penguin.

SYNOPSIS: A fair-skinned female veterinarian stands on the right side of the photo shown from the waist up. Opposite her, a Magellanic penguin stands on a towel set on a metal operating table. Because the penguin is on the table, the eyeline of the penguin and the veterinarian are almost equal. A veterinarian is reaching with a stethoscope around to the left side of the penguin.

Below the photo, there is the following statement: The Molina Animal Care Center is funded by Molina Healthcare, shown with its logo of three turquoise generic people figures shoulder to shoulder.

CAPTION: The Aquarium's Molina Animal Care Center includes a veterinary hospital, holding tanks, and animal exhibits.

CREDIT: Robin Riggs




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IMAGE and TEXT: Sustainable Reefkeeping (Page 11)



DESCRIBING: A small, circular photo of a clownfish

SYNOPSIS: A dark red clownfish with white stripes curls slightly in the tentacles of an sea anemone. The photo is focused on the clownfish.

CAPTION: Learn about maintaining responsibly sourced home aquariums at the exhibit near the Molina Animal Care Center.

CREDIT: Aquarium of the Pacific


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IMAGE and TEXT: Horseshoe Crabs (Page 11)



DESCRIBING: A small, circular photo of horseshoe crabs

SYNOPSIS: Five horseshoe crabs are stacked on top of each other in different ways. Three individuals are stacked on top of the shells. The edge of a sixth horseshoe crab’s shell is visible. However, six telson tails are clearly visible on top of the other horseshoe crabs and the sandy bottom.

Near the photo is the symbol for a touch area denoted by a hand with the index and middle finger pointed.

CAPTION: These animals play a critical role in our healthcare. Their blood is used to test vaccines, IVs, and implants for contamination.

CREDIT: Aquarium of the Pacific

RELATED TEXT: Horseshoe crabs (Limulus polyphemus)



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IMAGE and TEXT: Veterinarian (Page 11 Sidebar)



DESCRIBING: A color photo of veterinarians and husbandry staff providing care for an animal

SYNOPSIS: In the foreground, there is a person with their back visible possibly sitting or kneeling to work on an animal on top of an operating table. This table is in between the person in the foreground and three other staff standing up with their eye line towards the animal. The other veterinarian Dr. Lance Adams is a male with slightly tanned skin. He has his hands on the animal to help with the exam depicted in the picture. The other two are females; one with brown hair and fair skin standing next to Dr. Adams. On the far end is the other female and fourth person, who has blonde hair and tan skin.

CAPTION: Our head veterinarian Dr. Lance Adams and his team manage healthcare and treatment for about 1,000 different species of animals here at the Aquarium. Their job includes physical exams, surgeries, rescue and rehabilitation of injured wild animals, and caring for many babies.

CREDIT: Aquarium of the Pacific

RELATED TEXT: Veterinarian (Homo sapiens)



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IMAGE and TEXT: Artificial Insemination (Page 12)



DESCRIBING: A small, color photo of a zebra shark

SYNOPSIS: With a solid, dark blue background, a zebra shark appears to be swimming revealing its underside as if it were to swim overhead. There is a small, pink rectangle, which is the mouth of the zebra shark with its nares or shark nostrils just above. From those nares and until where a faint shadow begins, the belly is a pale white. The brown dorsal or back side can barely be seen with the small dorsal fin barely visible. There are very small dots between the brown and pale white sections that are the eyes of the zebra shark.

CAPTION: The Aquarium of the Pacific is part of groundbreaking research to breed sharks through artificial insemination. This can help make keeping sharks at aquariums more sustainable and has applications for increasing shark populations in the ocean. Fern, our female zebra shark, has successfully produced offspring via artificial insemination.

CREDIT: Ken Kurtis




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IMAGES and TEXT: Zebra Shark (Page 13 Sidebar)



DESCRIBING: A colored image of two zebra sharks

SYNOPSIS: Two zebra sharks are showing off the patterns of their skin. They are not the same because one of these is an adult and the other is a pup or young shark. The adult pattern can be identified as many, small circular dots across the body. In the photo, the dots are more concentrate near the eye, but not going past where the eye sits and where the nose is. This region is tan colored. The dots extend from where the eye sits towards the tail and where the dorsal fin on the back sits, these dots begin to lessen to reveal the tan colored skin much more clearly. The pup pattern is a series of thick black bars or stripes with thin, white lines to separating it.

CAPTION: These sharks get their common name from their striped appearance as pups. The stripes change into spots as the sharks grow into adults. Zebra sharks search for food at night, feeding on snails, clams, crabs, shrimp, and small fish.

CREDIT: Mark Ferguson / Wikipedia

RELATED TEXT: Zebra Shark (Stegastoma fasciatum)




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IMAGE and TEXT: Northern Pacific Gallery (Page 17)



DESCRIBING: Inset circular photograph of a giant Pacific octopus.


SYNOPSIS: A close-up of a giant Pacific octopus underwater.


IN-DEPTH DESCRIPTION: The octopus is positioned with their head/body (what is considered their head also holds their organs) on the right and arms on the left in the photo. Its left side is towards the camera and we see their eye in the top center of the image which has a noticeable slit for an iris. The octopus is red and very wrinkled in texture, displaying a couple of arms and suction cups in the foreground. 


RELATED TEXT: The Aquarium’s Northern Pacific Gallery focuses on the colder waters and fascinating animals of the Bering Sea. Visit our sea otters, diving birds, the giant Pacific octopus, and several species of sea jellies. 




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MAP: Second Floor Gallery Map (Page 17)



MAP: Second Floor Gallery Map (Page 17)

DESCRIBING: A map depicting part of the first floor of the Aquarium of the Pacific.

SYNOPSIS: This map shows the Northern Pacific Gallery at the Aquarium of the Pacific. This portion of the Aquarium highlights the ecosystems and animals in the Northern Pacific which consist of Northern California up to Alaska. You will find jellies, diving birds, giant Pacific octopus, an interactive tidepool touch lab, sea otter pups, and various fish and invertebrates.

IN-DEPTH DESCRIPTION:

LEGEND:

• Dark blue circle with a white number inside: Guide stop

• An icon of a line drawing of a hand with two fingers extended toward the bottom: Touch area.

• A small callout on the bottom right of the page just above the page number for the Aquarium’s Visitor Guide App has a small photo of a phone with the app on the screen. Accompanying text: Interactive Map. Download our Visitor Guide Mobile App!

2nd Floor Gallery Map – Northern Pacific Gallery

On the bottom of the map at approximately 6 o’clock, we see a walkway with two path leading into the gallery. The path on the left is considered the entrance and the path on the right is the exit. Just outside the entrance there is a landing with a digital exhibit called “Whales: Voices in the Sea” and just to the left of that are stairs that lead the visitor back down to the first floor.

As you go into the right entrance of the gallery, you will go through a Surge Channel. Upon exiting you will encounter Guide Stop 18 on either side of you with jellies on the left and diving birds on the right. As you continue through the gallery you will encounter the giant Pacific octopus exhibit and make a hard right. You will come upon the Coastal Corner Touch Lab on your left where you can gently touch animals with two fingers. Making your way past the lab you will visit Guide Stop 19: Sea Otter Habitat with an Embossing Station opportunity of a Sea Otter Pup on your right. As the path slowly curves to the right, you will eventually find yourself in a corner chockfull of smaller exhibits featuring Deepwater, Rocky Reef, Bays & Sounds, and Sandy Bottom habitats with accompanying fish and invertebrates. After a hard right you will find small “Jewels of the Northern Pacific” exhibits on the left showcasing some of the smallest residents in the gallery. Just before exiting the gallery you will encounter a medium sized exhibit Giant spider crabs.

CREDIT: Aquarium of the Pacific



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IMAGE: Pacific Visions Photo (Back Cover)



DESCRIBING: A color rectangular photo of a building


SYNOPSIS: Several blue glossy glass tiled into various curves create the undulating appearing of water as the exterior wall of the Pacific Visions theater at the Aquarium of the Pacific.


IN-DEPTH DESCRIPTION: In front, there is a green lawn with sunbeams highlighting the green into a yellowish green. Two people are walk on a path the separates the lawn from the base of the building. On the left side of the building, the glass curves upward into a space much narrower that the main building the photo is focused on. The sky behind is blue with trails of white clouds.



CREDIT: Tom Bonner





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IMAGE AND TEXT: Aquarium Address, Contact, and Hours of Operation



ADDRESS: 100 Aquarium Way Long Beach, CA 90802 aquariumofpacific.org

PUBLIC HOURS: Open 9:00 a.m.—6:00 p.m. daily except Christmas Day

AQUARIUM LOGO DESCRIPTION:

RELATED TEXT: Aquarium of the Pacific: a non-profit institution


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TEXT: Our Mission



The Aquarium of the Pacific is a non-profit 501(c)3 institution with a mission to instill a sense of wonder, respect, and stewardship for the Pacific Ocean, its inhabitants, and ecosystems. We rely heavily on the generous donations of individuals and organizations.


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TEXT: Our Vision



To create an aquarium dedicated to conserving and building natural capital (nature and nature's services) by building social capital (the interactions between and among people).


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TEXT and LINK: Donate



TEXT: Scan the code below to support your Aquarium!

DONATE LINK: https://support.aquariumofpacific.org/give/232613/?utm_source=print&utm_medium=visitor_guide&utm_campaign=2022#!/donation/checkout


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TEXT: Membership



Apply the cost of your admission to a membership and enjoy the Aquarium in the best way possible—as a member! Members receive unlimited free admission for twelve months in addition to exclusive access, special discounts, and so much more. Beyond the valuable benefits, your membership support also helps protect the ocean and its inhabitants.


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TEXT: Education



The Aquarium of the Pacific hosts a variety of engaging programs and events on site and virtually for adults, families, and children.


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TEXT: Volunteer



Do you want to make a difference? The Aquarium depends on volunteers to help us achieve our mission of ocean education and conservation.


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TEXT: Gift Stores



Be sure to stop by our gift stores for a unique selection of gifts, toys, books, educational items, housewares, clothing, and art.


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TEXT: Adopt an Animal



You can adopt an animal to help support the care of our Aquarium family. In return, you receive an adoption certificate, animal updates, and much more.


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TEXT: Special Events



Host your wedding, family reunion picnic, corporate party, or other special event at the Aquarium.


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TEXT and LINK: Seafood for the Future



Learn about sustainable seafood. Visit seafoodforthefuture.org for more information.


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TEXT: Media Statement



During your visit, you may be filmed, videotaped, or photographed by an Aquarium of the Pacific employee, volunteer, or contract service professional. Your admission to our facility serves as permission for use of your image by the Aquarium of the Pacific and its constituents. The commercial use of photographs, video, and film you may have taken during your visit is strictly prohibited without the full written consent of the Aquarium of the Pacific.


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